Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘celebration’

The history of your Favorite Foods: Pizza, Ice cream . . .

In Stories, Travel on November 3, 2014 at 18:30
 So how do we track back in time to find the origins, the stories of how our favorite foods began?
  Who put fortunes in cookies and tomato sauce on spaghetti?
 Food pairings and cultural dishes have a long history.  From spice trades, to climate regions, culinary history continues to evolve.  Natural food traditions complement what was in season – what was in season also supports exactly what our immune system and our overall physical nutritional health.
 Steamed winter greens such as spinach drizzled with olive oil and a lot of lemon juice is a Greek food staple known as Horta.   If the greens were eaten with cheese or just salt, for example, you wouldn’t get the benefit of  absorbing the high levels of Calcium and Iron in the vegetable.  When lemon juice or other foods high in Vitamin C are added to the greens, this assists the body for absorption – plus spinach is delicious with lemon juice anyway! Win-win.
So that’s just the nutritional side . . . on the history side, this info-graphic produced by Cheapflights.ca tells it how it is.  Anthropology of Food . . . .  I love it!  Appetite for variety – I celebrate all things real food.  Enjoy!
the history behind your favourite foods 53cd2cdd68e9e w640 How and Where the Worlds Most Beloved Foods Started (INFOGRAPHIC)

Sushi photo (slider) via Shutterstock

Share. Cook. Love: The Cook Book

In Events, Friend's Kitchens, Recipe, Stories on August 5, 2012 at 15:53

Athena and Chris on The Culinary Linguists blog #cookbook

Our story began 2005, Feb 14th.

Durban, South Africa.  A Surfer met a Gypsy at Capoeira class.  It was a Monday, after the first day of our third year at University.

7 years later, in the province where it all began, we told everyone we loved to join us for a festival of families, a love

celebration . . . our wedding.

Friends and family came as far as California, Thailand, Belgium and Detroit. And on the Monday before our wedding I was given the most thoughtful and loving gift.

My sister, Koko, compiled a recipe book that she titled:

A collection of recipes on The Culinary Linguists blog #cookbook

Share. Cook. Love

The cookbook

Gathered by the women that love you.

As I opened this gift at my surprise Kitchen Tea, it felt as though my heart was reliving my most touching memories-an overwhelming feeling of love washed over me and misted my eyes.  I paged through over 50 recipes of family and friends that represented so many facets in my life.  From friends that were celebrating our marriage from afar, in Brasil, New York, Chicago and Nicaragua- I was able hear their voice through their shared words and recipes.  This cookbook was made for me and the diversity in dishes and loving varieties directly reflected the beautiful community of women in my life.  From dressings, to desserts, every tradition and recipe chosen for my own personal anthology of culinary linguists will be cherished throughout my life.

Now when I am missing my family and friends and want to create and cook from my heart–I can thank everyone who contributed to this emblem of friendship and love.  As a bride, it was a collage of memory that reverberated through my heart and now as a wife, it is a personal love resource from all the sisters and mothers that I get to celebrate with.  I have years of memory and new memories to look forward to, by creating edible creations curated by them.

This is culinary linguists at it’s best: a true example of love.

My family recipe contributors on The Culinary Linguists blog #cookbook

My mom, sister, myself and mamabel

Athena and Chris Wedding Day on The Culinary Linguists blog #wedding

Our wedding day June 30th

Athena and Chris on The Culinary Linguists blog #love

the day before our wedding day

The recipe book on The Culinary Linguists blog #cookbook

Diving into the culinary linguists!

Athena and Koko on The Culinary Linguists blog #family

Koko and I in 1984

Athena, Bride to be on The Culinary Linguists blog #wedding belindaandAthenakitchenteakitchenteainDurban Wedding Stationary Athena and Chris on The Culinary Linguists blog #wedding Athena and Chris' reception on The Culinary Linguists blog #wedding

What to Eat when Visiting Greece’s villages: Nourishing Food Traditions

In Stories, Travel on February 5, 2012 at 13:24

Greek village food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece   Summertime and road tripping lead to some of my favorite food adventure memories.  In Greece, you can drive on national highways and come across Greek village tavernas that serve greek horiatiki salads under grapevines.  Roadside stalls are piled with local fresh, dried, and preserved food that have been made and celebrated for centuries.  Tradition, food sovereignty, and pride for fresh Greek food is celebrated in most Greek villages you visit.  It certainly reigns true in the Greek village of my Greek summer food memories, Alepohori.  My grandmother, Yiayia Chrissy was born there, and I have grown to know the similar tastes and smells she must have enjoyed in her youth. From the chestnut tree forests and oregano-lined mountains, everything was grown organically and families shared the fruits of the Arcadian soil.  Visiting Alepohori today provides me with hundreds of simple food pleasures.  Today, I am sharing a few of my many favorites that you can enjoy.

1. Drink Ouzo.   If you can find local and homemade, even better.  In the village, drinking ouzo is pastime and for some . . . an immune booster 😉 You could claim that walking down to the tavern or to your neighbour’s house for  glass of ouzo on the hill is the reason why people live to 100 here, not to mention consuming a fresh medley of mezedes everyday.   If you like to enjoy long afternoons with traditional tiny plates of food and company from your neighbours, drink ouzo.

Greek Ouzo on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

2. Pick figs and eat them.  If you are lucky enough to be in Greece during the months of July, August, September then you will be in wild food harvesting heaven.

Greek figs on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

3.  Keep an eye out for summer fruit trees.  A simple mountain walk in the afternoon will lead you to picking fresh public produce from the fruit trees.  Below is a modest harvest of bite size Grecian yellow plums.

Picking plums on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek village cats on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

4.  Visit the local cheese dairy and choose the best tasting Feta made from Goat’s milk.  If there are different cheese varieties, buy a small portion of Manouri cheese and fry it up on a skillet at home.

ImageGreek food and cheese on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceImage

5. Pick fresh tomatoes from the vine and prepare a traditional Greek village salad:

 Greek salad recipe

2 large tomatoes (cut into bite size chunks)

Put in a medium-sized bowl and add salt to taste.  Toss the tomatoes so the salt draws out the juices.

Add a half a long thin cucumber (cut into half slices)

1/4 of red onion (cut into thin slices)

1/2 green pepper (cut into thin slices)

Mix the salad together.

Drizzle Extra Virgin Olive Oil over the salad and a pinch of fresh or dried oregano.

1 slice of your fresh feta cheese (portion to your desire)

Place feta on top of the salad and sprinkle more oregano and drizzle more oil.

Add 5-7  marinated olives to the salad.

Grab forks and dive in.

(Note: Once you’ve finished you salad, leave an extra piece of Greek village bread and soak up all the golden juice: salt, tomato juice, oil and oregano, leaving your bowl clean.

Greek salad on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece #recipe

6.  Visit the local farms in the village.  Most are private plots and operate on biodynamic systems that yields incredible organic produce, beautiful to photograph and even tastier to eat straight from ground.

Greek food and natural farms on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Greek food and honey on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Be sure to taste honey made in the Peloponnesus mountains

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece
Greek men on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece
Greek child on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek donkey on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek Sunflower on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

7.  Find out where your honey comes from.  Greek honey is so fragrant that getting a chance to see where all the flowers are in bloom makes your next spoonful a visual and sensory treat and a proud locavore.

Greek bread on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

8. Buy Greek village bread.  Next to Alepohori, there is another village, Blakhokeresia, that makes delicious authentic bread.

9.  Learn from your grandmothers.  Every house you visit, or path you cross is an opportunity to learn, taste and enjoy traditional and personal Greek food favorites.  Practice your culinary linguistics and enjoy the range of hospitality that is shown through the food and culture.  Greek village woman on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

10.  Share a delicious Greek village lunch feast with family and neighbors.  Digest it all by taking a nap-preferably in a hammock, underneath the chestnut trees.

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Souvlaki, rice, Greek Salad, baked lemon oven potatoes, sauteed tomato and green beans and anything else that may get piled onto your plate. It will be tasty!

Greek food and village on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Love and Local Produce on the Umtamvuna River Bank

In Events, Travel on August 1, 2011 at 09:58

We found it, one part wild, one part green, two parts water and three parts love.  The place we plan to get married and celebrate the love adventure and journey up ahead.  And it has been ever evolving into a beautiful recipe with such variations and discoveries, the metaphor for love found in the chemistry of the right geographical elements.

Two verveet monkeys played together as joyful greeting to our arrival from the winding road. The sparkle from the Umtamvuna river bed bounced light from the 2 o’clock sun. I knew, we had arrived.  Ses’fikile.

The road leading to the river lodge gave signs of all the gifts this fertile bank offers, eventhough, the word Umtamvuna has been translated as the “Reaper of Mouthfuls” due to river floods that had taken away crops from the people farming on the banks.  Farm stalls lined Izingolweni Road with signs of seasonal produce available: Macadamia, Pecans, Cashews, Bananas, Oranges, Lemons, Butternut, Spinach and Cabbage.

There was also free range inkhukhu chicken eggs and a variety of locally produced preserves, sauces, biltong, etc.  This all made my heart beat with happiness-cause it was evident that we can have a deliciously seasonal and locally produced wedding feast for our loved ones celebrating and supporting us in our marriage.  I was a kid in a candy store, only my tastes have evolved. I was drooling over the cappuccino cream we tasted at Beaver Creek Farm and the freshly cracked Macadamia nuts we sampled in its raw flavourful delight.

Food variations and feast ideas came popping into our heads and I felt so grateful for the possibility of it all coming into place.  I’ll keep you updated on the menu ideas we have up our sleeve.  I’m so happy it’s citrus season which will be very useful to make the Tequila and Tortilla Bar happen!

Celebrating Vetkoek, Beats and Madiba at the the Ubuntu Festival in Cape Town

In Events on July 18, 2011 at 13:53

Ubuntu Festival-Madiba's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownTata Mandela celebrates his 93rd birthday today.  His life and dedication to the public’s well being has been a symbol for us to trust that we have the capacity to make changes in our life that leads to freedom and positive transformation.  Giving life to metaphors.  On Sunday, July 17th, the city of Cape Town hosted the Ubuntu Festival.  Activities were bustling on St. George’s Mall & Church St and on the ground level of the Mandela Rhodes Place.

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Festival-Madiba's birthday-vetkoek on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownA festival that bridges the city’s diverse spirit had independent locally produced food and farm stalls and young local DJ’s and muso’s that delivered positively hip bass-bumping beats from the Red Bull converted land cruiser turned DJ booth. I especially enjoyed GoldTooth’s vocals that dripped like honey off the amp.

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownMandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Inside the Mandela Rhodes Place, festival attendants could give 67 minutes of their time (The number of years Mandela dedicated to public service) to wash, peel, and chop vegetables for soup that was being made for the city’s shelters.  The Charity Cook and Chop had tables of donated vegetables from Shoprite surrounded by tables of chopping boards, knives and peelers that were populated by shifts of about 50 people at a time.  Everyone was in a meditative state, getting into the rhythm of chopping onions, or peeling carrots.  Some people confessed it was a therapeutic activity to prepare the food together, peel, cut and chop and watch the crates fill with all the chopped vegetables.

Ubuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownCraig Anderson, the Chief Chef at Mandela Rhodes Place led the kitchen logistics of transforming the ingredients into soup. A call for volunteers to stir and cook was announced over the upbeat radio pop songs that were provided by 94.5 Kfm when the Chef needed to quickly prepare the dinner shift for the restaurant upstairs. “Just take a look around you!” exclaimed Craig Anderson, “It’s great! All this soup will be picked up by Red Cross at 5pm to be delivered to the city’s shelters”  So much love was being put into this communal cooking event and it wasn’t the first or last time the Charity Cook was going to happen.Vegetables on Cutting board on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Earth Fair Market on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Outside along Church St and St. George’s Mall, the Earth Fair Food Market curated the stalls that served traditional Umngqusho and Vetkoek, free-range biltong, farm-cured olives and preserves, Chinese spring rolls, a variety of fragrant curries, chilli bites, freshly juiced apples and beetroot, savory pies, and sublime local wine and beers at The Laughing Crocodile Bar.

Olive Products in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownBeef Biltong in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown Fresh Produce in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownFresh Juice in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Fat cake in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Vetkoek a.k.a Fat Cake, Fried Dough, Donut of delicious Msanzi variety

The Ubuntu Festival celebrated the beautiful struggle of freedom, bringing dancing vibrations and nutritious food together in our public city centre to commemorate communities celebrating together in a democratic South Africa. With the spirit of Ubuntu in all of us-Happy Birthday Madiba!

Mandela in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Communal Meals and Charcuterie at Glen Oakes Guest Farm

In Friend's Kitchens, Stories, Travel on July 6, 2011 at 16:50

Have you ever stayed in a stone cottage with pigs and sheep as your next acre neighbour? In Hemel an Aarde Valley, there is a pig farm.

Eight of us spent an electricity-free weekend on a farm greeting free-ranging piglets and making communal breakfast from the farm’s fresh eggs (and guess where the bacon came from).  A year ago, I wouldn’t have eaten pork or thought spending a weekend on a pig-raising farm was going to be so much fun.  I have a childhood memory of seeing my first live pig at an Illinois Country Fair.  The hog walked around a small ring and then laid lazily on his side until people voted on what colour ribbon he would receive.  He could have been related to a rhino and I was mesmerised by his size and demeanour.  This time around, I was mesmerised by healthy active pigs in their free-ranging environment.

In the Hemel-and-Aarde Valley, on Glen Oakes farm, we walked along the paths and dirt roads that wove through the pig’s grazing range.  We stopped by the fence to get a closer look at the tubby mammals and two large female pigs boldly came up to greet us. “You’d think they like their ears scratched but they love their eyes to be tickled” Julie explained, the owner of Glen Oakes Farm.  At the main house, Julie tallied and weighed our choices of Richard Bosman charcuterie, “You’ll see that the coppa is so well marbled which is due to our pigs having lots of space and room to roam around.”  It was the first time I was on a pig farm, witnessing the condition of the pig’s home, meeting the chocolate brown breeding boar, Major, and then consuming the charcuterie made from the raised pig’s at the Glen Oakes farm. Here’s more on the free-range to charcuterie story.

It was a fascinating full food cycle that turned the weekend into a foodie affair.  We roamed right back to the stone cottage with our basket of charcuterie, waving past the piglets and female pigs and made a platter of the chorizo, fennel sausage, cheese and artisan breads in front of the fire. We were truly consuming ethical charcuterie, except for our vegetarian Inge who proclaimed her clear conscious to all of us:) She took beautiful pictures of the surroundings with medium format film.

Our foodie night affair commenced with Three bean Raw Cilantro Salsa, Garlic Artisan Ciabatta, Butternut Soup, Fillet with Tomato Balsamic Relish and a handmade Lemon Tart.

Andrew’s plate

Breakfast was a mosaic of fresh fruit, grapefruit-orange cocktail to quench, farm scrambled eggs, slow roasted cherry tomatoes and rye bread from jason bakery.  Sixteen hands all contributed to fabulous feasts of farm fresh produce.  A love for slow homemade food was celebrated and spoke a language of appreciation for communal meals shared by friends, chew by chew.  Glen Oakes Guest Farm was also an inspiration and a positive example of how ethical food practices are an essential element to our food democracy.

Raise your Glass to Gugulethu Wine Festival

In Events, Travel on June 28, 2011 at 15:41

Just like food and wine pairing flavours highlight salt, sweet, sour, bitter or umami (lekker or ‘scrumptious’), the Gugulethu Wine Festival proved to be a super umami event experience pairing all the right festival flavours. On the same weekend of the Good Food and Wine Festival, Gugulethu hosted a vibrant well-attended wine tasting event founded by Mzoli Ngcawuzele (owner of Mzoli’s Place) and Lungile Mbalo. The founders explained that the festival aims to enrich and serve the well populated township as a whole by showcasing the community as a vibrant market for wine brands, highlighting “Gugs’ as a tourist destination, and experiencing and hosting South African wine festivals in a proud community style.

It was evident that many people enjoying the festival were passionately appreciating a proud South African commodity. The vibe was positively buzzing, networks bridging, people sipping on the lifestyle quality of wine and wine tasting. It was the inaugural festival of wine in Gugulethu and proved to be a magnetic atmosphere that may inspire more food, wine and lifestyle festivals of Cape Town to be hosted in Gugulethu.

As for the wine-tasting, Plaisr De Merle-Cabernet Sauvignon, Solms-Hiervandaan and Re Mogo Pinotage were my top favorites. I didn’t get a chance to do the winetasting with Nederburg Wines but did enjoy the opportunity to start my Saturday night evening in Gugulethu which has never proven to be salty, sour or bitter, just sweet/Umami. Here’s to more vibrant events for Cape Town in well-populated communities outside the city centre.

Pomegranates for Breakfast

In Stories on June 8, 2011 at 00:31

ruby juice star sign

If theres one thing I like about winter its the fact that pomegranates are readily available to my tastebud’s needs.  If I had to make up a fast or some sort of ‘cleanse detox’ sort of regime it would be to eat pomegranates for breakfast lunch and dinner and in this ‘detox,’ we would have pomegranate desert.

So here I am on my balcony on a mild Cape Town winter afternoon and opening up a ripe red pomegranate with just the right amount of juicy ruby kernels. This moment could be the equivalent to someone lighting up with delight as they see a rainbow or a pair of zebra in the distance.  Me, I’m easy, yeah a rainbow and zebras are cool but send me a crate of pomegranates for my birthday and my heart beats with happiness forever-but ripe ones please (don’t torture me).

Another great idea: People! Let’s line our streets with fruit trees, not oak and maple!  And if your in my hood then I’ll be there with my pomegranate seeds planting new trees every year on every corner.  Until then, I wait until the pomegranates are at the height of their season and are on sale at my nearest market so I can afford to buy about 10 at a time cause my fruit basket only wants pomegranates in winter.  I feel I am doing my Greek girl duty to delight myself on such a Mediterranean activity of eating pomegranates everyday, an anciently-respected sweet beautiful treasure.

edible masterpiece

Each individual morsel is a fantastical taste bud circus, it beats housing a packet of Starburst or a bag of Skittles, which I could devour with almost the same delight.  Eating a pomegranate stains your lips and mouth the same as it’s artificial fruit posers.  So maybe that’s why i love pomegranates so much, as my South African compadres always remind me “Only American’s really LOVE candy”.  So if that’s the case we are arguing, then yes, pomegranates are my natural candy treat.  Every pomegranate is like opening up a variety pack of flavours, each segment being unwrapped and devoured to maximize full flavour capacity and the best part is it’s packaging gets enjoyed by the worms.

So go buy your own packet of “Ruby Juice Bursts!’ (That’s what I would call them if I had to market them like candy.) And now that pomegranates are synonymous with candy, will we start giving pomegranates out to trick-or-treaters for Halloween? Well, hopefully in coming years, kids of all ages, including me, can go pick them their selves at their nearest street corner lined with Ruby Juice Burst Trees.  I’ll take Granada flavour please.

Diego’s Fish Festival Birthday in De Waterkant

In Events, Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on April 3, 2011 at 22:23

When you meet Kimon and Diego, you’ll understand that when they throw a birthday party it becomes a street feast festival of seafood, love, family and friends.   On Sunday afternoon, there were four generations of family and friends, sharing steamed paprika-cream mussels out of the pot and apricot-butter fish fresh off the BBQ under the shady hibiscus trees in De Waterkant, Cape Town.

Finger food: dunk your bread in the pot and top it off with a marinated mussel

When I entered the kitchen, there were six friends already preparing an element to the feast; boiling the potatoes, chopping the parsley, crushing garlic, etc.

Preparing the Octopus potato salad

Diego was in the kitchen with a cold Corona in one hand, and a kilo of fresh octopus in the other.  He confirmed that, “Everything made in this kitchen is made with love,” he exclaimed, enjoying the bustle of his kitchen and wearing his pinstripe apron with a hand-sewn felt caricature of Kimon and Diego’s dog, Ferdinando.

Linguine con le vongole

The food that was brought, shared and prepared for Diego’s fish festival birthday party was a testament to how handmade food caters love to everyone’s digestive system.

We celebrated that Sunday with Kimon as our menu MC, hosting popping flavours, beautiful friends in a breathtaking city for what I hope becomes an annual feeshy street birthday festival of shared handmade feasts and love.

Kimon's kitchen graffiti

Crispy flaky philo quejo cups, wish I had more than just one!

The traveling mussel pot of white wine and creme deliciousness. Avô picking his share of the mussels

MC Kimon and Catch of the Day: Diego

Yes thats a gem squash serving as a bowl for mussel stew

a spicy tomato mussel pot

 

raw salsa appetiser on rye crackers

Recipe for Raw Salsa on Crackers:

2 fresh tomatoes

1 onion

1 small bunch of scallions

1 can of corn

3 TB olive oil

1 carrot

sprinkle of salt, pepper, cumin and parsley

Grate tomatoes and onion into a fresh pulp.  Chop scallions and add to the tomato and onion mixture.  Stir in one washed can of corn and chopped scallions.  Add oil, salt, pepper, parsley and cumin to taste.  Spread out rye crackers on a platter and dish one spoonful of the salsa on the crackers.  Grate thin strips of carrot and sprinkle as garnish over the salsa.  Serve immediately to hungry guests.

Salsa feasting

Recipe for Diego’s Octopus Potato Salad:

1 kilo octopus

1 large bunch of fresh parsley

8 potatoes

4 finely chopped cloves of garlic

Clean and pound the octopus to make the meat tender.  Boil water and dunk the octopus in the water at 2-3 second intervals 5 times.  Once octopus is cooked enough to not break the muscles down in your jaw, cut the tentacles and body into bite-sizes pieces.  Put them in a large bowl with  the garlic and salt/pepper  and olive oil to taste.  Cut the potatoes into bite-size chunks and boil until soft. Drain the potatoes and add them to the octopus. Stir and mix in the fresh parsley, adding more oil and salt to taste.  Serve with freshly ground pepper or a drizzle of red wine vinegar.

 

Octopus salad

The Search for Cape Town’s Best Gatsby Sandwich

In Events, Stories, Travel on March 30, 2011 at 01:07

Once upon a time there was the Gatsby Sandwich.  Related to its American cousin, Hoagie. Gatsby is South African, from the Cape Flats, and is the ultimate meal you can carry like a newborn baby, it’s as heavy as one too, crammed with a variety of ingredients and most commonly accompanied with chips stuffed inside.

The Gatsby can be described and assembled as follows: Slice open a whole white bread French loaf.  Line with lettuce, tomatoes and french fries (chips). Fill with desired ingredients such as fried calamari and Thousand Island dressing or Steak, Egg and Cheese, or Cheese and Perinaise.  Close the top half of the bread to make a sandwich and cut into four parts.  Graze as one whole meal or share with a Gatsby-lover friend.

Since I’ve been living in Cape Town for 3 years, I’m on the search for proudly South Africa and Cape Town food.  Food dishes that were born here and continued to be celebrated here at take-away cafes, street markets or your Auntie’s kitchen.  These are the foods you crave if you ever have to leave Cape Town or South Africa.

So,  I’m on the search for the best Gatsby in the Cape Town. I started at Shop 1 Block 1 in Gatesville Shopping Area.  At the Golden Dish, I ordered a 1/2 order Masala Steak Gatsby- I know what you’re thinking, ‘A half-order?’ but I was on a budget. Luckily, at the Golden Dish, the ‘mini’ is R39.  The Golden Dish claims itself as a Five Star Halaal Take-Away and Fast Food Joint (Mom’s Only Competition).  I waited for my number to be called and picked up my giant Gatsby sandwich.  The Golden Dish slogan is ‘often eaten-always remembered’.

 

The Full Gatsby

After I posed with my newborn Gatsby, I opened it up and realized, “Wait, this ain’t no half order and the Masala Steak looks like pink Polony and Chips.  I hijacked someone else’s order and had to return my massive Gatsby for the true ‘mini’ Gatsby, with Masala Steak.  There’s no kidding about portion control at the Golden Dish, the Gatsby here does not mess around, this is the real thing, and the ‘mini’ is still a full meal.  If you aren’t ordering Gatsbies, there are bunny chows, salomies, curries, burgers, hot dogs, platters, salads and sandwiches.  But stay true to the Cape Town tradition: there are 23 Gatsby versions on the menu, a Vegi Delite and a Masala Steak Full House Gatsby to name a few.

 

I’m proud to live in a city that hosts a majestic player, the Gatsby,  in the world’s stage of global sandwich variations.  My friend, Mary, was a judge in a Chicago sandwich competition: 3 categories-hot, cold, freestyle.  After my search for the best Gatsby in Cape Town, I think I may have to host a Cape Town’s Gatsby competition: Description – 1 pt.  Taste – 10 pts.  Presentation – 4 pts. Ambition – 5 pts. So far, Golden Dish gets a grand total of: Description: 1, Taste: 7, Presentation: 4 Ambition: 3.  Total for Masala Steak Gatsby: 15/20

Golden Dish Salomie

Salomie Grab

 

%d bloggers like this: