Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘breakfast’

8 of the Tastiest Locally-Made Foods That Will Make Your Day | Cape Town, South Africa

In Friend's Kitchens, Travel on May 24, 2015 at 18:16

The Culinary Linguist-Cape Town best food listKeeping the love alive.

These 8 food creators in Cape Town, South Africa win my heart.  Yes, the list can go on and will.  But this is what comes to mind for now.  Guide yourself down this golden road of food happiness that #willmakeyourday and please share with me your favourites to add!

Cake-Bomb--the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena1. CupCake Richard 

Because everyone should eat cake or cupcakes.

If your tummy, tongue and tastebuds vary to the degree of “I can’t eat wheat, sugar, or carrots” then fear not –  you can eat these cakes.  Yes, I’m talking to you gluten-freedom fighters, etc out there.  Dive in.  They don’t exclude anyone.  They keep it fun and innovative with their recipes so ALL can enjoy.  Out of the kindness of their hearts (and yours), they take it upon themselve to cake bomb every last friday of the month to someone who deserves the love of 12 cupcakes personally delivered to them in Cape Town.  That is the coolest thing a baker could ever gift 🙂  Random Acts of Kindness!

#willmakeyourday 🙂

To get hold of some cake:

info@cupcakerichard.com   tel: 083 737 3417  Cape Town

ferdinando's Pizza- Culinary Linguist Cape Town Food list

Pizza Ferdinandos -the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena 2. Ferdinando’s Pizza (Hindi & the Shanico) & Garlic Aioli

Laughter, Peace, Pizza and Love.  This wood-burning pizzeria is a bubbly and beautiful dream come true.  Creators, Diego and Kimon, weave their joy and flavours into two beautiful places that serve wholesome, delicious and fantastical pizza and platters that leave you smiling inside and out.  Diego’s pizza dough is incomparable to the countless pizza houses around Cape Town – no one comes close to the crispy chewy sourdough crusts and the fun variety of pizza toppings. Check out the beginning of their story here and continue it for yourself at these spots:

  • 84 Kloof Street, Gardens, Cape Town
  • NEW!! 205 Lower Main Rd, Observatory, Cape Town
  • Pizza cape Town the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena084 771 0485 to book a table
  • ferdinandospizza@gmail.com  Tuesday to Saturday 6pm – 10pm on Kloof
  • Call for lunch & dinner hours for Observatory

Chocolate -the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena3. Soma Confection Custom Chocolates

The no-limit soldier of chocolate, Heather Thompson, is inspired by fun, quirky and delicious . . . chocolate creations.  This includes edible book pages, brains, and Darth Vader.  Amongst other things, when she’s not found spinning vinyls, dreaming and scheming apocalypse survival tips, she’s making your dreams come true in edible chocolate forms.  Ask about her 420 spa too!

072 632 7288  – Heather

Spinach Bread-the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena4. Espinaca Innovations Spinach Bread 

Popeye power in a bread loaf: Espinaca serves up freshly baked green bread with hints of cayenne and bay leaf to boost your nutrition and well-being.  Pair it up with their freshly pressed apple, pineapple and spinach juice.  Take home their spinach and feta muffins and spread their message to your friends.  The Spinach Bread King, Lufefe, has big plans and his green food movement is rolling out all over Cape Town.  Support!

No 42 Spine Road, Khayelitsha
Cape Town, Western Cape
073 095 0119 -Spinach Bread King, Lufefe

Mariam's Kitchen -the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena

5. Mariam’s Kitchen Salomies 

The flakey pastry, a.k.a Mariam’s rotis, is the type of dish that you crave when you are overseas.  Nothing else compares to the spices and hand-rolled dough that makes up these classic salomies.  Order a bean or steak masala salomie with your favourite fizzy drink to bring a taste of home cooking into your lunchtime.  Every crispy, gooey bite #willmakeyourday.

101 St George’s Mall Arcade, CBD.  7:30am -4pm

Oumeul Pies Cape Town - The Culinary Linguist by Athena

6. Oumeul Bakkery Pies

It all started on a road trip on the N2, Garden Route.  Pass by Riviersonderend and load up on the freshly baked spinach and cheese pies.  Whether it’s lamb, bobotie or chicken pie, the recipe and tradition #willmakeyourday in Cape Town at these locations:

14 Long Street CBD & Willowbridge

Peshwari naan-the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena

7.  Eastern Food Bazaar’s Peshwari Naan and Coconut Ice Cream

For the coconut lovers out there.  Dried grated coconut and ghee baked inside freshly prepared flatbread, then top it with coconut ice cream made with natural ingredients!  It’s a DIY gourmet combo in the middle of the bustling city arcade from noon til 11pm!

96 Longmarket St, Cape Town, 8001

Telephone: +27 21 461 2458.

Opening Hours: Monday to Thursday: 11:00am – 10:00pm. Friday & Saturday: 11:00am – 10:30pm

Cape Town bakeries-Lazari-the culinary linguist-Athena8.  Lazari’s Millionaire Squares & All-Day breakfast

Butter, sugar, chocolate alchemy at it’s best.  Chris and the team at Lazari are like the family you always wanted.  They make scrumptious baked goods, pies and daily specials in Vredehoek.  What #willmakeyourday is the daily baked goods by the cash register – buy at least six of the toffee Millionaire squares to take home after you’ve enjoyed a breakfast on a late Saturday morning.  Although this friendly neighbourhood cafe is famous for their white pink chocolate and vanilla cupcakes – I will never say no to the Millionaires!

Corner of Upper Maynard and Vredehoek Ave, Cape Town, 8001

hello @ lazari .co .za

021 461 9865

  • MON-FRI7.30am – 5pm
  • SAT-SUN8.30am – 4pm

Yes, and the list could go on . . .

Let me have it.

culinary linguist food list by Athena

photos are my own or jacked from the Google intraweb 🙂 Thanks!

How to make South African beer – uMqombhothi from Maize Meal

In Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on February 3, 2015 at 19:34

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Sip Sip sippin on uMqombhothi: A nutritious beer made from maize meal which can transform into a sweet or savoury porridge when cooked known as Idokwe. how to make south african beer maize umqombhothi

 The thing is, a recipe is a map – but your destination is your own alchemy.  With naturally fermented foods, it’s an all element creation.  Whether you are in the tropical swamps, humid concrete jungle or a dry desert land, your fermented food/drink will react and grow in different ways (just like my hair does when it rains 🙂
 I’ve got bottles of experiments, from pineapple wine to apple cider scobys growing by the day.  However, uMqombhoti is a recipe to inspire you to learn various food traditions from all over the world while bringing your own kitchen alchemy and culinary linguistics to the table.
South African beer-maize meal umqombhoti idokwe recipe -
 Alongside pineapple and ginger beer, uMqombhoti has an enhanced pungent taste, high in Vitamin B and most often shared communally from a ceramic bowl, gourd or pot used for the fermentation process.  It’s tradition and magic has been celebrated in South African homes for years – so when I asked my friend, @noksangoma to share her method for making one of the famous fermented drinks, she went on to say:
I dont have a ‘recipe’ for umqombhothi, I just follow an intuitive process in preparing it, because nobody actually told me how to make it. My ‘recipe’ is a mix of how my maternal grandmother makes umqombothi and how the eldest wives in my dad’s family make it.

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 Ingredients
maize meal
sorghum – king korn umthombo (green packet)
water
brown sugar (optional)
 How to make South African Maize Beer-Umqombhoti - via The Culinary Linguist
2.
mix equal quantities of imithombo with maize meal.
make a paste using boiling water.
place in a container (a bucket or big jar or jug. preferably use ukhamba, if you dont have a clay one, a plastic one will suffice)
store the mixture on in a dark corner or on the floor. overnight, or for 2 or 3 days – depending on how hot it is.
3.
when the mixture smells a little fermented, boil water in a pot and add the paste slowly while stirring continuously (like how you make custard)
lower the stove’s heat as the mixture thickens. let it simmer for about an hour. once this is cooked, it’s called idokwe and is delicious as a porridge with lots of sugar.
4.
cool idokwe – this may take a few hours.
once cooled down, mix the idokwe with cold water and mush it up with your hand til it’s drinking consistency
the potency of the umqombhothi depends on the magic of your mixing hand. my left hand is my mqombhothi mixing hand. my left side is my grancestor/feminine side – they are with me when I make umqombhothi.
How to make South African Maize Beer-Umqombhoti - via The Culinary Linguist
5.
once youve mixed idokwe with cold water, add more imithombo to the mixture and mix with your hand, and if you wish, some brown sugar to help the fermentation process along 🙂
again, place in a dark corner for about 3 days while it ferments.
6.
once the umqombhothi is fermented, it smells a little pungent, and little bubbles will be popping on the surface
strain the fermented mixture. the solid sorghum bits are called izinsipho. you may freeze a handful of izinsipho to use in a new batch of umqombhothi (izinsipho help to ferment a batch quicker, since theyve already fermented before)
 Food-Recipes-How to make South African Maize Beer-Umqombhoti - via The Culinary Linguist
7.
pour a cupful of umqombhothi as an offering, place in a sacred space in the home. this is for amaDlozi (spirit elders/ancestors/spirit guides)
8.
enjoy the rest!
rules for umqombhothi:
it is considered rude to drink umqombhothi while standing.
umqombhothi is best enjoyed with others. preferably while sitting in a circle, before a meal or after
umqombhothi is used as an offering in ceremonies and rituals. it is an integral part of cultural and spiritual ceremonies.
 Thanks Noks!  xx  Love, The Culinary Linguist

Communal Meals and Charcuterie at Glen Oakes Guest Farm

In Friend's Kitchens, Stories, Travel on July 6, 2011 at 16:50

Have you ever stayed in a stone cottage with pigs and sheep as your next acre neighbour? In Hemel an Aarde Valley, there is a pig farm.

Eight of us spent an electricity-free weekend on a farm greeting free-ranging piglets and making communal breakfast from the farm’s fresh eggs (and guess where the bacon came from).  A year ago, I wouldn’t have eaten pork or thought spending a weekend on a pig-raising farm was going to be so much fun.  I have a childhood memory of seeing my first live pig at an Illinois Country Fair.  The hog walked around a small ring and then laid lazily on his side until people voted on what colour ribbon he would receive.  He could have been related to a rhino and I was mesmerised by his size and demeanour.  This time around, I was mesmerised by healthy active pigs in their free-ranging environment.

In the Hemel-and-Aarde Valley, on Glen Oakes farm, we walked along the paths and dirt roads that wove through the pig’s grazing range.  We stopped by the fence to get a closer look at the tubby mammals and two large female pigs boldly came up to greet us. “You’d think they like their ears scratched but they love their eyes to be tickled” Julie explained, the owner of Glen Oakes Farm.  At the main house, Julie tallied and weighed our choices of Richard Bosman charcuterie, “You’ll see that the coppa is so well marbled which is due to our pigs having lots of space and room to roam around.”  It was the first time I was on a pig farm, witnessing the condition of the pig’s home, meeting the chocolate brown breeding boar, Major, and then consuming the charcuterie made from the raised pig’s at the Glen Oakes farm. Here’s more on the free-range to charcuterie story.

It was a fascinating full food cycle that turned the weekend into a foodie affair.  We roamed right back to the stone cottage with our basket of charcuterie, waving past the piglets and female pigs and made a platter of the chorizo, fennel sausage, cheese and artisan breads in front of the fire. We were truly consuming ethical charcuterie, except for our vegetarian Inge who proclaimed her clear conscious to all of us:) She took beautiful pictures of the surroundings with medium format film.

Our foodie night affair commenced with Three bean Raw Cilantro Salsa, Garlic Artisan Ciabatta, Butternut Soup, Fillet with Tomato Balsamic Relish and a handmade Lemon Tart.

Andrew’s plate

Breakfast was a mosaic of fresh fruit, grapefruit-orange cocktail to quench, farm scrambled eggs, slow roasted cherry tomatoes and rye bread from jason bakery.  Sixteen hands all contributed to fabulous feasts of farm fresh produce.  A love for slow homemade food was celebrated and spoke a language of appreciation for communal meals shared by friends, chew by chew.  Glen Oakes Guest Farm was also an inspiration and a positive example of how ethical food practices are an essential element to our food democracy.

Pomegranates for Breakfast

In Stories on June 8, 2011 at 00:31

ruby juice star sign

If theres one thing I like about winter its the fact that pomegranates are readily available to my tastebud’s needs.  If I had to make up a fast or some sort of ‘cleanse detox’ sort of regime it would be to eat pomegranates for breakfast lunch and dinner and in this ‘detox,’ we would have pomegranate desert.

So here I am on my balcony on a mild Cape Town winter afternoon and opening up a ripe red pomegranate with just the right amount of juicy ruby kernels. This moment could be the equivalent to someone lighting up with delight as they see a rainbow or a pair of zebra in the distance.  Me, I’m easy, yeah a rainbow and zebras are cool but send me a crate of pomegranates for my birthday and my heart beats with happiness forever-but ripe ones please (don’t torture me).

Another great idea: People! Let’s line our streets with fruit trees, not oak and maple!  And if your in my hood then I’ll be there with my pomegranate seeds planting new trees every year on every corner.  Until then, I wait until the pomegranates are at the height of their season and are on sale at my nearest market so I can afford to buy about 10 at a time cause my fruit basket only wants pomegranates in winter.  I feel I am doing my Greek girl duty to delight myself on such a Mediterranean activity of eating pomegranates everyday, an anciently-respected sweet beautiful treasure.

edible masterpiece

Each individual morsel is a fantastical taste bud circus, it beats housing a packet of Starburst or a bag of Skittles, which I could devour with almost the same delight.  Eating a pomegranate stains your lips and mouth the same as it’s artificial fruit posers.  So maybe that’s why i love pomegranates so much, as my South African compadres always remind me “Only American’s really LOVE candy”.  So if that’s the case we are arguing, then yes, pomegranates are my natural candy treat.  Every pomegranate is like opening up a variety pack of flavours, each segment being unwrapped and devoured to maximize full flavour capacity and the best part is it’s packaging gets enjoyed by the worms.

So go buy your own packet of “Ruby Juice Bursts!’ (That’s what I would call them if I had to market them like candy.) And now that pomegranates are synonymous with candy, will we start giving pomegranates out to trick-or-treaters for Halloween? Well, hopefully in coming years, kids of all ages, including me, can go pick them their selves at their nearest street corner lined with Ruby Juice Burst Trees.  I’ll take Granada flavour please.

Oat Milk Pancakes with Peach and Pear Syrup

In Recipe on March 22, 2011 at 09:09

This isn’t a vegan recipe but it can be.  It’s an alternative pancake recipe when you look into your fridge and realize the milk is all gone.  You’re still in your pajamas, too hungry to wait in a check-out line at the grocery store, so your creativity kicks in and you make a plan.

How to make Oat Milk

With a coffee grinder, grind ½ cup of oats until it becomes flour/powder. To make oat flour by the cup, add 2-3 tablespoons of the flour in a bottle and 1 cup room temperature water.  Shake the bottle so the flour disperses evenly.  Refrigerate and shake before using.

Oat-milk Tahini Pancakes with Peach-Pear syrup

1 cup stone ground brown bread wheat flour

1 cup oat milk

1 T tahini (high source in calcium)

1 T oil

1 egg

1 t baking soda

1 T sugar

½ t salt

Makes 3-4 pancakes.

Peach-Pear Syrup

1 ripe peach

1 ripe pear

2 T butter

⅓ sugar

Add your oil, egg, tahini and oat milk together and whisk.  Mix the sugar, salt, baking soda and flour together.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix together to make a batter.

Heat your griddle on high coated with a light layer of butter.  Pour one ladle of the pancake batter into the middle of the hot griddle and let it spread evenly.  Turn the pancake over when you start seeing bubbles form.  Flip the pancake and let it cook on the other side for 15 seconds.  Remove the pancake and place on a plate and place in a warming drawer.  Repeat until all the batter is used up.

Heat a small sauce pan on high and melt the butter.  Dice the peach and the pear keeping the juices from cutting the fruit.  Add the diced fruit and juice to the sauce pan and stir the melted butter evenly around the fruit.  Add sugar and let it simmer for 4-8 minutes until a syrupy consistency forms.  Remove from heat and pour over pancakes.  Eat and enjoy immediately.  Garnish with fresh cream and mint.

Fool-proof Crepes

In Recipe, Stories on January 10, 2011 at 10:56

For my birthday this year,  my ‘sweet as sugarcane’ man made us a crepe

Birthday sweets

breakfast.  His speciality in the kitchen ranges from delicious pasta dishes, creative braai ‘BBQ’ fish marinades, and his exceptional skill to flipping crepes with ‘kitchen ninja zen’ style.  There is no need for a spatula when he is around so I got a grand show of crepe-making perfection on my summer scorpion birthday.

 

 

Kitchen ninja skills: flippin' the crepe

 

When my mom visits us in Cape Town she spoils us with her own food creations and gifts-us essential kitchen necessities to recreate them, hence, why we have the most amazing T-fal Dura-base Tehnology crepe pan.  I have her crepe recipe taped to the back of my cupboard door so we can be reminded how easy it is to recreate them just as if mom was around asking if we want Nutella crepes (my love affair and ‘break-up’ with Nutella will be explained in future posts).

 

 

Home gardening

 

Strawberry season begins in November in South Africa and this year our home food gardening was successful enough to grow our own tasty sweet strawberries.  For this birthday crepe breakfast, there was just three hanging from the bush but nonetheless they proudly were eaten with our crepes.  The easy quick crepe recipe goes like this:

 

Fool-proof crepes:

 

2 eggs

¾ cup milk

1 cup flour

½ cup water

3 T melted butter

 

For sweet crepes add:   1 T sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla

For savoury crepes add: ½ teaspoon salt

fresh herbs and spice

 

Melt the butter in a pan on low heat and let it cool.  Beat the eggs in a bowl. Add the milk, water and cooled butter to the bowl.  Mix well and slowly stir in the flour.  The batter should be a consistency that is easy to pour.  Heat the crepe pan on medium heat and coat with a thin layer of butter.  Using a ladle, slowly pour a thin layer of batter on to the warm pan until it covers the surface of the pan easily.  Watch the batter cook on medium heat and when small bubbles start to form throughout the batter.  Flip or use a spatula to turn the crepe tocook evenly on the other side.  Your crepes should be golden brown for them to be cooked and soft enough to fold around your desired ingredients.  These crepes had a handful of strawberries, a sprinkle of cinnamon, a squeeze of lemon and a healthy dose of fresh cream.  A great start to any birthday!  Thank you sweetness.

 

 

 

 

Morning Power Smoothie with Baobab Fruit Powder

In Recipe on September 8, 2010 at 16:05

A morning smoothie that uses super-powered natural foods to the best of their ability. You’ll consider fruit and nut gathering as a hobby after making this potion.

Baobab Smoothie on The Culinary Linguist Blog #smoothie

Ingredientes:

1 cup Oats (ground)

2 cups water/tea

1 TB wheatgrass

2 tsp Maca

2 TB flax powder

1 TB hemp powder

1 TB baobab fruit powder

1 TB unheated honey

1/2 TB coconut oil

10 almonds

4 medium sized pitted dates

2 frozen bananas

Garnish: Raw Bee Pollen, Cacao

The story:

The Coffi Thermoazzo.  I bought the saucy little number at a China Shop in Kalk Bay.  I loved the look of it, the old 50’s candy red and white, it was only R25 and it still worked eagerly.  Now it is my most prized appliance to assist in the random grind of the kitchen.  It barely grinds coffee beans these days though, but can grind and finely dice many other things.

This is what is it used for in the morning potion:

-Grind a cup of Oats.  Grinding a cup of oats is an easier and fresher way to give your smoothie a dairy-free base. Instead of adding two cups of water to the base I sometimes add cooled green or rooibos tea for extra bonus anti-oxidants  rather than just plain ol’ agua.

Next, adding all these powders, proteins, grains and nuts completes this potion into a full vitamin meal.  Your morning potion will naturally sustain your energy through the first quarter of your day.

Why the potion is so deliciously fine?

Baobab Fruit Powder: The baobab tree found in Southern Africa is pure magic. So being able to have access to it as a local product makes my heart sing louder. The powder forms naturally inside the fruit. It’s rich in anti-oxidants (said to be more than double compared to cranberries and pomegranates, and three more times than blueberries). It contains pectin, which enhances the prebiotic bacteria in the large intestine, similar to what homemade yoghurt does for the body.  Plus its a source of iron, potassium, magnesium which promote a healthy body PH.  The main thing for all non-dairy or low-dairy eating habits: Baobab contains higher levels of calcium than milk and far easier to absorb and digest.  I apologise in advanced if you don’t live in Southern Africa and may not have access to the fruit of the African Baobab, but if somehow you want or need a care package, let me know:)

Hemp Seed Powder: No they don’t contain THC, and yes this seed is highly misunderstood. Yet, let’s get over that and focus on the bonus features.  Hemp seed contains all 10 essential amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein.  Proteins found in hemp seed manufacture antibodies and support liver and kidney health. The fiber in hemp seed keeps colon health in check and overall its a great aid muscle building and energy booster.

Maca: It comes from the Andes, super expensivo here, but nonetheless it was worth trying once and it lasts a long while. Its a root which always harbours fine minerals and vitamins that lead to overall health benefits than defaults.  Plus, its a natural aphrodisiac.   It balances hormones and increases energy, endurance and strength.  The legend is Inca warriors used to eat Maca before going into battle.  Well, why not put this in your morning potion?

Virgin Coconut Oil: a spoonful of this stuff is medicine! Virgin means it hasn’t been heated which means all the goodness hasn’t been lost due to heat.  Coconut oil does goodness outside and inside the body, so don’t worry about the saturated fats it has cause all the acids like lauric acid prevents high cholesterol and blood pressure. There is so much going on when you enjoy coconut oil, I suggest your do research to convince yourself and enjoy it inside and out! And if you don’t end up using it for recipes, your epidermeris layer will appreciate it.

Almonds: the lovely wonder nut. Nuts are high in essential fats and protein giving you energy, supplying your body with fiber and good doses of Vit E, plus it gives your  smoothie a crunch.

Dates: The sweet taffy of the palm. My favorite is when the processor doesn’t quite chop everything fine and I get a big chunk of the chewy date at the end of the smoothie. YUM!

Bee Pollen: New to this, but am loving it.  I feel like a   wannabe bumble bee or hummingbird, reaping all the benefits of flowers.  Do people harvest flower nectar? hmmm, anyway, more research to be done about pollen but the health benefits are convincing and the taste is scrumptious.

Unheated Honey: I love honey so much I just checked out a book on how to be an apiarist in southern Africa.  Unheated honey is used to get the maximum goodness from what honey provides.  Honey is used as a natural energy boost. And if I were to rewrite Mary Poppins, it would be just a spoonful of honey, makes the medicine go down.

Bananas: The potassium, the vitamins oh my.  Peel them when they’re brown, freeze them, and there you go: instant frozen smoothie elements that all frozen delicousness.

Cacao: An excuse to make this potion more like a dessert for breakfast? Natural boost of energy and anti depressant, pus a good natural appetite suppressant. No

Wheat Grass: because it’s green it must be healthy?  Well if you put too much your smoothie will taste straight up like you chowed a piece of lawn in solidarity of free-range cows.  So Go easy with this. I used a powder which seems to be very potent. I’d rather be chopping it from a wheat grass tray but I’m not speaking that green thumb kitchen garden language fluently yet. It’s the colour of Ninja Turtle ooze without the toxic waste.  Overall, wheat grass assists in overall gastrointestinal health.  The chlorophyll is a potent antioxidant, assists in anti-inflammatory, antibacterial red blood cell boosting.

So the list of what all these positive elements give is enough to say yes to this green morning potion.  At least for me, I will happily guzzle this a few times a week when I’ve got those frozen bananas around.

Maybe you can’t stand banana and used more frozen dates, or strawberries. Please share other elements or flavours you substituted with the ingredients.  Would love to learn!

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