Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘love’

The history of your Favorite Foods: Pizza, Ice cream . . .

In Stories, Travel on November 3, 2014 at 18:30
 So how do we track back in time to find the origins, the stories of how our favorite foods began?
  Who put fortunes in cookies and tomato sauce on spaghetti?
 Food pairings and cultural dishes have a long history.  From spice trades, to climate regions, culinary history continues to evolve.  Natural food traditions complement what was in season – what was in season also supports exactly what our immune system and our overall physical nutritional health.
 Steamed winter greens such as spinach drizzled with olive oil and a lot of lemon juice is a Greek food staple known as Horta.   If the greens were eaten with cheese or just salt, for example, you wouldn’t get the benefit of  absorbing the high levels of Calcium and Iron in the vegetable.  When lemon juice or other foods high in Vitamin C are added to the greens, this assists the body for absorption – plus spinach is delicious with lemon juice anyway! Win-win.
So that’s just the nutritional side . . . on the history side, this info-graphic produced by Cheapflights.ca tells it how it is.  Anthropology of Food . . . .  I love it!  Appetite for variety – I celebrate all things real food.  Enjoy!
the history behind your favourite foods 53cd2cdd68e9e w640 How and Where the Worlds Most Beloved Foods Started (INFOGRAPHIC)

Sushi photo (slider) via Shutterstock

Share. Cook. Love: The Cook Book

In Events, Friend's Kitchens, Recipe, Stories on August 5, 2012 at 15:53

Athena and Chris on The Culinary Linguists blog #cookbook

Our story began 2005, Feb 14th.

Durban, South Africa.  A Surfer met a Gypsy at Capoeira class.  It was a Monday, after the first day of our third year at University.

7 years later, in the province where it all began, we told everyone we loved to join us for a festival of families, a love

celebration . . . our wedding.

Friends and family came as far as California, Thailand, Belgium and Detroit. And on the Monday before our wedding I was given the most thoughtful and loving gift.

My sister, Koko, compiled a recipe book that she titled:

A collection of recipes on The Culinary Linguists blog #cookbook

Share. Cook. Love

The cookbook

Gathered by the women that love you.

As I opened this gift at my surprise Kitchen Tea, it felt as though my heart was reliving my most touching memories-an overwhelming feeling of love washed over me and misted my eyes.  I paged through over 50 recipes of family and friends that represented so many facets in my life.  From friends that were celebrating our marriage from afar, in Brasil, New York, Chicago and Nicaragua- I was able hear their voice through their shared words and recipes.  This cookbook was made for me and the diversity in dishes and loving varieties directly reflected the beautiful community of women in my life.  From dressings, to desserts, every tradition and recipe chosen for my own personal anthology of culinary linguists will be cherished throughout my life.

Now when I am missing my family and friends and want to create and cook from my heart–I can thank everyone who contributed to this emblem of friendship and love.  As a bride, it was a collage of memory that reverberated through my heart and now as a wife, it is a personal love resource from all the sisters and mothers that I get to celebrate with.  I have years of memory and new memories to look forward to, by creating edible creations curated by them.

This is culinary linguists at it’s best: a true example of love.

My family recipe contributors on The Culinary Linguists blog #cookbook

My mom, sister, myself and mamabel

Athena and Chris Wedding Day on The Culinary Linguists blog #wedding

Our wedding day June 30th

Athena and Chris on The Culinary Linguists blog #love

the day before our wedding day

The recipe book on The Culinary Linguists blog #cookbook

Diving into the culinary linguists!

Athena and Koko on The Culinary Linguists blog #family

Koko and I in 1984

Athena, Bride to be on The Culinary Linguists blog #wedding belindaandAthenakitchenteakitchenteainDurban Wedding Stationary Athena and Chris on The Culinary Linguists blog #wedding Athena and Chris' reception on The Culinary Linguists blog #wedding

Pink Pancake Recipe with Strawberry and Beetroot

In Recipe on November 17, 2011 at 12:21

Healthy Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #beetroot

Mickey Mouse pancakes were cool growing up.  I  got to eat dessert for breakfast; sugar-gooey syrupy pancakes with chocolate chip eyes, a cherry nose and whip cream smiles.  These days, I discovered eating pink pancakes are just as fun for breakfast and have a natural sweetness thanks to the sugarbeet and strawberries added in the batter.  By transforming your juiced fiber from your juicer into a delicious batter you can get a nutritious colorful pancake fry-up for breakfast that tastes like dessert but provides you with a wholesome breakfast.  It looks like you are cooking playdough, but I promise it’s tastes much than your days at preschool.

Here is this fun-blushing recipe:

Juice in your juicer:

1 beetroot

6 strawberries

Remove the fiber of the beetroot and strawberries from inside your juicer and place in a separate bowl.Strawberry and Beet Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #breakfast

Mix dry ingredients first:

1/2 cup flour

2 TB sugar

1 tsp baking powder

1/4 cup oat milk powder

Then add:

1 egg

Beetroot & Strawberry fiber

Slowly pour 1/3 cup water (or the beetroot/strawberry juice) into the bowl until batter is at a  thick but smooth consistency.

Heat a dab of butter/oil on your griddle and spoon the batter on the surface, spreading it out in the shape you desire. Spread it out to about a centimeter deep and let it cook on one side on high heat for 3 minutes. If it’s easy to slide on the pan, then flip it. This batter is super easy to flip but can burn fast so keep an eye on it.

Frying Note:  Since there is beetroot and strawberries mixed into the batter, the inside layer between the cooked sides will remain soft.  Don’t mistaken it as it being undercooked . . . It won’t become cooked dough because the heated beetroot and strawberry give it the soft gooey consistency on the inside.  When it gets to a golden colour on both sides, consider it cooked.

Here’s the fun part.  When you take it off the heat, spread tahini on top or mascarpone cheese.  Serve with fresh strawberries and your favorite syrup.  I drizzled the famous Prickly Pear for added sweetness. Garnish as you like using fresh fruit.

Strawberry and Beet Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #breakfast #africa

Sweet Note: The sweetness of the strawberries and beetroot are already in the batter, so add more of less sugar into the batter to your taste.  I like things sweet so adding just 2 TB is enough since I load up the pancakes with syrup afterwards.  Plus if you substitute water for beet-strawberry juice, than the sweet content will be even higher, leaving no need for sugar.

TIP:  These pancakes can easily become savoury, just leave out the sugar.  Enjoy pink pancakes for lunch and add stir-fried vegetables or a lentil curry inside. Yum!

To Cook or Dehydrate: Raw Food Recipes and Creativity

In Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on November 8, 2011 at 11:54

Rawlicious on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

I just learned how to harvest Aloe Ferox from the ‘cook’ book Rawlicious-Recipes for Radiant Health.  It’s a recipe book that encourages you to make colourful and vibrant food by encouraging you to put aloe in your smoothies, have sprouts as a kitchen staple,  and make edible flower salads that look like birthday confetti.  Who wouldn’t want to pick flowers and eat them too? 

I’ve enjoyed some great raw food dishes from this book made by friends who have created delicious versions of the Mango-gooseberry cheesecake and savoury snacks. The Rawlicious team, Lexi, Beryn and Peter, have put together a beautiful book that makes it fun and intriguing to incorporate raw dishes into your daily graze.  I don’t think I’ll ever substitute pancakes on the griddle for dehydrated ones but I most definitely will enjoy the creativity that goes into making other raw food dishes.  It’s a proudly South African Raw Recipe book that even attempts biltong in the form of aubergine. Props to that! I most definitely am going to try it out and attempt the beetroot ravioli too. I love having a recipe book that experiments with all the possibilities that food in it’s natural element has to offer.  Stay tuned for some posts on making these raw recipes come alive in true culinary linguistic style.

Raw Food on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

Do you have any great raw recipes to share?  I’d love to hear your tips, post your links, methods, and pics right here. The food pictures posted are from home gardens in my paternal grandmother’s village, Alepohori, Greece in the Peloponnese.  A place where radiant health is determined by the food you grow and the food you eat.

Raw Food on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

Love and Local Produce on the Umtamvuna River Bank

In Events, Travel on August 1, 2011 at 09:58

We found it, one part wild, one part green, two parts water and three parts love.  The place we plan to get married and celebrate the love adventure and journey up ahead.  And it has been ever evolving into a beautiful recipe with such variations and discoveries, the metaphor for love found in the chemistry of the right geographical elements.

Two verveet monkeys played together as joyful greeting to our arrival from the winding road. The sparkle from the Umtamvuna river bed bounced light from the 2 o’clock sun. I knew, we had arrived.  Ses’fikile.

The road leading to the river lodge gave signs of all the gifts this fertile bank offers, eventhough, the word Umtamvuna has been translated as the “Reaper of Mouthfuls” due to river floods that had taken away crops from the people farming on the banks.  Farm stalls lined Izingolweni Road with signs of seasonal produce available: Macadamia, Pecans, Cashews, Bananas, Oranges, Lemons, Butternut, Spinach and Cabbage.

There was also free range inkhukhu chicken eggs and a variety of locally produced preserves, sauces, biltong, etc.  This all made my heart beat with happiness-cause it was evident that we can have a deliciously seasonal and locally produced wedding feast for our loved ones celebrating and supporting us in our marriage.  I was a kid in a candy store, only my tastes have evolved. I was drooling over the cappuccino cream we tasted at Beaver Creek Farm and the freshly cracked Macadamia nuts we sampled in its raw flavourful delight.

Food variations and feast ideas came popping into our heads and I felt so grateful for the possibility of it all coming into place.  I’ll keep you updated on the menu ideas we have up our sleeve.  I’m so happy it’s citrus season which will be very useful to make the Tequila and Tortilla Bar happen!

Celebrating Vetkoek, Beats and Madiba at the the Ubuntu Festival in Cape Town

In Events on July 18, 2011 at 13:53

Ubuntu Festival-Madiba's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownTata Mandela celebrates his 93rd birthday today.  His life and dedication to the public’s well being has been a symbol for us to trust that we have the capacity to make changes in our life that leads to freedom and positive transformation.  Giving life to metaphors.  On Sunday, July 17th, the city of Cape Town hosted the Ubuntu Festival.  Activities were bustling on St. George’s Mall & Church St and on the ground level of the Mandela Rhodes Place.

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Festival-Madiba's birthday-vetkoek on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownA festival that bridges the city’s diverse spirit had independent locally produced food and farm stalls and young local DJ’s and muso’s that delivered positively hip bass-bumping beats from the Red Bull converted land cruiser turned DJ booth. I especially enjoyed GoldTooth’s vocals that dripped like honey off the amp.

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownMandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Inside the Mandela Rhodes Place, festival attendants could give 67 minutes of their time (The number of years Mandela dedicated to public service) to wash, peel, and chop vegetables for soup that was being made for the city’s shelters.  The Charity Cook and Chop had tables of donated vegetables from Shoprite surrounded by tables of chopping boards, knives and peelers that were populated by shifts of about 50 people at a time.  Everyone was in a meditative state, getting into the rhythm of chopping onions, or peeling carrots.  Some people confessed it was a therapeutic activity to prepare the food together, peel, cut and chop and watch the crates fill with all the chopped vegetables.

Ubuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownCraig Anderson, the Chief Chef at Mandela Rhodes Place led the kitchen logistics of transforming the ingredients into soup. A call for volunteers to stir and cook was announced over the upbeat radio pop songs that were provided by 94.5 Kfm when the Chef needed to quickly prepare the dinner shift for the restaurant upstairs. “Just take a look around you!” exclaimed Craig Anderson, “It’s great! All this soup will be picked up by Red Cross at 5pm to be delivered to the city’s shelters”  So much love was being put into this communal cooking event and it wasn’t the first or last time the Charity Cook was going to happen.Vegetables on Cutting board on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Earth Fair Market on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Outside along Church St and St. George’s Mall, the Earth Fair Food Market curated the stalls that served traditional Umngqusho and Vetkoek, free-range biltong, farm-cured olives and preserves, Chinese spring rolls, a variety of fragrant curries, chilli bites, freshly juiced apples and beetroot, savory pies, and sublime local wine and beers at The Laughing Crocodile Bar.

Olive Products in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownBeef Biltong in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown Fresh Produce in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownFresh Juice in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Fat cake in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Vetkoek a.k.a Fat Cake, Fried Dough, Donut of delicious Msanzi variety

The Ubuntu Festival celebrated the beautiful struggle of freedom, bringing dancing vibrations and nutritious food together in our public city centre to commemorate communities celebrating together in a democratic South Africa. With the spirit of Ubuntu in all of us-Happy Birthday Madiba!

Mandela in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Pomegranates for Breakfast

In Stories on June 8, 2011 at 00:31

ruby juice star sign

If theres one thing I like about winter its the fact that pomegranates are readily available to my tastebud’s needs.  If I had to make up a fast or some sort of ‘cleanse detox’ sort of regime it would be to eat pomegranates for breakfast lunch and dinner and in this ‘detox,’ we would have pomegranate desert.

So here I am on my balcony on a mild Cape Town winter afternoon and opening up a ripe red pomegranate with just the right amount of juicy ruby kernels. This moment could be the equivalent to someone lighting up with delight as they see a rainbow or a pair of zebra in the distance.  Me, I’m easy, yeah a rainbow and zebras are cool but send me a crate of pomegranates for my birthday and my heart beats with happiness forever-but ripe ones please (don’t torture me).

Another great idea: People! Let’s line our streets with fruit trees, not oak and maple!  And if your in my hood then I’ll be there with my pomegranate seeds planting new trees every year on every corner.  Until then, I wait until the pomegranates are at the height of their season and are on sale at my nearest market so I can afford to buy about 10 at a time cause my fruit basket only wants pomegranates in winter.  I feel I am doing my Greek girl duty to delight myself on such a Mediterranean activity of eating pomegranates everyday, an anciently-respected sweet beautiful treasure.

edible masterpiece

Each individual morsel is a fantastical taste bud circus, it beats housing a packet of Starburst or a bag of Skittles, which I could devour with almost the same delight.  Eating a pomegranate stains your lips and mouth the same as it’s artificial fruit posers.  So maybe that’s why i love pomegranates so much, as my South African compadres always remind me “Only American’s really LOVE candy”.  So if that’s the case we are arguing, then yes, pomegranates are my natural candy treat.  Every pomegranate is like opening up a variety pack of flavours, each segment being unwrapped and devoured to maximize full flavour capacity and the best part is it’s packaging gets enjoyed by the worms.

So go buy your own packet of “Ruby Juice Bursts!’ (That’s what I would call them if I had to market them like candy.) And now that pomegranates are synonymous with candy, will we start giving pomegranates out to trick-or-treaters for Halloween? Well, hopefully in coming years, kids of all ages, including me, can go pick them their selves at their nearest street corner lined with Ruby Juice Burst Trees.  I’ll take Granada flavour please.

The secret to making Oscar-winning Popcorn

In Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on February 28, 2011 at 23:53

The Academy Awards came and went but yet the popcorn-maker is still at work-satisfying each movie-goers mesmerizing experience in the world of cinema stories. You pay more for a Cherry Coke and Jumbo sized popcorn than a sit-down dinner at the show, and somehow a movie screening isn’t the same without this cinema snack.

My pops, a self-proclaimed super-taster, a.k.a Bones, loves

a.) Great Films

and

b.) Excellent Popcorn.

Luckily, we growing up with a Homemade Popcorn aficionado, we never knew what a bottom pile of unpopped kernels or  burnt popcorn ever tasted like.  Renting videos from the local Video Adventure film rental meant that Dad was in the kitchen later systematically pouring kernels into a deep pot, preparing for the home movie experience.  Today, I asked for his popcorn-making method because no movie would win an Oscar without popcorn made like this:

First:  Prepare your counters and kitchen stove top

popcorn production studio

Use your favorite kernels

dig through the pantry

open the kernel bag carefully

Pour Coconut oil one kernel deep in pot.
pouring the oil 'one kernel deep'
Cover bottom of pot with kernels all around but not layered.

covering the pot o' buttered gold

Turn on gas burner to medium heat. Cover and do not shake pot.

the waiting game: covering the pot until silence

When kernels appear to have all popped; wait for 5-10 seconds of silence and turn off heat. Lift cover slowly.

the opening show

Pour all into bowl. Lightly salt with popcorn salt. Microwave butter for 20-30 seconds and pour.

You now are eating great popcorn.

Red Carpet smile of an Academy-award winning Poppa

If no coconut oil you can use corn oil. 

Tony L.

Homemade Chocolate in a Jar

In Recipe, Stories on February 14, 2011 at 13:43

 

The source of love in chocolate

Breakfast on Valentine’s day involved me, a spoon and my Love Source jar. This chocolate is goddessa concoction of coconut oil, cacao, agave syrup and vanilla pod with niblets of an orange essence. It’s from the ladies of I Heart Life Outside The Box where poetry and chocolate unite  just in time for Valentine’s Day. This is definitely a fine example of food language love. Viva homemade superfood chocolate! Happy Valentine’s Day with wishes and kisses from a lover of Love Source.

 

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