Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘Tomato’

Easy Spicy Zesty Sweet Chickpea Salad Recipe

In Recipe on June 27, 2013 at 14:34

Easy-Pineapple-Carrot-Chickpea-Salad-The Culinary-Linguist

What happens when you juice pineapples, carrots and fresh green serrano chiles?

A spunky zesty salad with sweet and spicy flavours can be created to fuel you through the day.   Last week, we bought lots of great farm produce from the City Bowl Market.

Back at home, I put pineapple and carrots and threw in a couple fresh green serrano chiles into the juicer to see if anything would come out.  Some great juice was made, but the pulp left inside was looking equally nutritious and delicious.

Spontaneous creations is how I would describe my kitchen technique.  I love creating recipes that make ordinary whole foods into unique delicious dishes.  Like James Beard once said, “When cook, you never stop learning.  That’s the fascination of it.”  With any chance to experiment in my kitchen with fresh ingredients, I let the space between mistakes and alchemy emerge.  Adding chiles into the juicer seemed natural and somehow, necessary.

I’ve shared some fun recipes before that have worked out great like: Strawberry-Beetroot Flapjacks, and Banana-Pecan Sorbet.  When creations in the kitchen lead to easy vibrant dishes, I get excited to share them with you.  Here’s what happened when I decided to juice green chiles with pineapples and carrots:

 The Spicy Zesty Sweet Chickpea Salad

Instead of throwing the pulp from the centrifugal juice extractor away or into your compost bin, try adding it to recipes like this one:

Juice and fiber of three medium sized carrots

 Juice and fiber of half a small pineapple

 Juice and fiber of two green serrano chiles

 Juice of and fiber of large lemon and zest

500 grams of sprouted or cooked chickpeas  (garbanzo beans)

1 finely chopped fresh red pepper

1 finely chopped red onion

1 diced roma tomato

Salt, pepper and cumin to taste

Handful of fresh cilantro leaves and stems, finely chopped dhania

Handful of coarsely crushed unsalted cashews

2 Haas avocados

Easy-Pineapple-Carrot-Chickpea-Salad-The Culinary-LinguistJuice the carrots, pineapple, chillies, and lemon in a juicer (with any centrifugal, one-gear, etc).  Empty the juice into a large mixing bowl, and scrape the pulp from inside the juicer into the same bowl.  Add the diced tomato, red pepper, chickpeas, onion, salt, cumin, pepper and lemon zest into the bowl with juice and pulp.  Mix well and let it sit and marinate for 20 minutes.  Mix dhania into the salad, leaving some leaves for garnish.

Cut the avocados into half and remove the flesh from the avocado shell.  Slice the avocado into long slices.  Scoop the salad into the halves of the avocado shell as an appetizer serving bowl.  Place avocado slices and dhania leaves on top as garnish.  Enjoy!  The salad can definitely be stored in the fridge and be enjoyed the following day.

Tip:  It’s best to stir in the dhania and avocado when you plan to serve and eat it immediately.

What to Eat when Visiting Greece’s villages: Nourishing Food Traditions

In Stories, Travel on February 5, 2012 at 13:24

Greek village food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece   Summertime and road tripping lead to some of my favorite food adventure memories.  In Greece, you can drive on national highways and come across Greek village tavernas that serve greek horiatiki salads under grapevines.  Roadside stalls are piled with local fresh, dried, and preserved food that have been made and celebrated for centuries.  Tradition, food sovereignty, and pride for fresh Greek food is celebrated in most Greek villages you visit.  It certainly reigns true in the Greek village of my Greek summer food memories, Alepohori.  My grandmother, Yiayia Chrissy was born there, and I have grown to know the similar tastes and smells she must have enjoyed in her youth. From the chestnut tree forests and oregano-lined mountains, everything was grown organically and families shared the fruits of the Arcadian soil.  Visiting Alepohori today provides me with hundreds of simple food pleasures.  Today, I am sharing a few of my many favorites that you can enjoy.

1. Drink Ouzo.   If you can find local and homemade, even better.  In the village, drinking ouzo is pastime and for some . . . an immune booster 😉 You could claim that walking down to the tavern or to your neighbour’s house for  glass of ouzo on the hill is the reason why people live to 100 here, not to mention consuming a fresh medley of mezedes everyday.   If you like to enjoy long afternoons with traditional tiny plates of food and company from your neighbours, drink ouzo.

Greek Ouzo on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

2. Pick figs and eat them.  If you are lucky enough to be in Greece during the months of July, August, September then you will be in wild food harvesting heaven.

Greek figs on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

3.  Keep an eye out for summer fruit trees.  A simple mountain walk in the afternoon will lead you to picking fresh public produce from the fruit trees.  Below is a modest harvest of bite size Grecian yellow plums.

Picking plums on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek village cats on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

4.  Visit the local cheese dairy and choose the best tasting Feta made from Goat’s milk.  If there are different cheese varieties, buy a small portion of Manouri cheese and fry it up on a skillet at home.

ImageGreek food and cheese on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceImage

5. Pick fresh tomatoes from the vine and prepare a traditional Greek village salad:

 Greek salad recipe

2 large tomatoes (cut into bite size chunks)

Put in a medium-sized bowl and add salt to taste.  Toss the tomatoes so the salt draws out the juices.

Add a half a long thin cucumber (cut into half slices)

1/4 of red onion (cut into thin slices)

1/2 green pepper (cut into thin slices)

Mix the salad together.

Drizzle Extra Virgin Olive Oil over the salad and a pinch of fresh or dried oregano.

1 slice of your fresh feta cheese (portion to your desire)

Place feta on top of the salad and sprinkle more oregano and drizzle more oil.

Add 5-7  marinated olives to the salad.

Grab forks and dive in.

(Note: Once you’ve finished you salad, leave an extra piece of Greek village bread and soak up all the golden juice: salt, tomato juice, oil and oregano, leaving your bowl clean.

Greek salad on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece #recipe

6.  Visit the local farms in the village.  Most are private plots and operate on biodynamic systems that yields incredible organic produce, beautiful to photograph and even tastier to eat straight from ground.

Greek food and natural farms on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Greek food and honey on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Be sure to taste honey made in the Peloponnesus mountains

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece
Greek men on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece
Greek child on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek donkey on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek Sunflower on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

7.  Find out where your honey comes from.  Greek honey is so fragrant that getting a chance to see where all the flowers are in bloom makes your next spoonful a visual and sensory treat and a proud locavore.

Greek bread on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

8. Buy Greek village bread.  Next to Alepohori, there is another village, Blakhokeresia, that makes delicious authentic bread.

9.  Learn from your grandmothers.  Every house you visit, or path you cross is an opportunity to learn, taste and enjoy traditional and personal Greek food favorites.  Practice your culinary linguistics and enjoy the range of hospitality that is shown through the food and culture.  Greek village woman on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

10.  Share a delicious Greek village lunch feast with family and neighbors.  Digest it all by taking a nap-preferably in a hammock, underneath the chestnut trees.

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Souvlaki, rice, Greek Salad, baked lemon oven potatoes, sauteed tomato and green beans and anything else that may get piled onto your plate. It will be tasty!

Greek food and village on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Communal Meals and Charcuterie at Glen Oakes Guest Farm

In Friend's Kitchens, Stories, Travel on July 6, 2011 at 16:50

Have you ever stayed in a stone cottage with pigs and sheep as your next acre neighbour? In Hemel an Aarde Valley, there is a pig farm.

Eight of us spent an electricity-free weekend on a farm greeting free-ranging piglets and making communal breakfast from the farm’s fresh eggs (and guess where the bacon came from).  A year ago, I wouldn’t have eaten pork or thought spending a weekend on a pig-raising farm was going to be so much fun.  I have a childhood memory of seeing my first live pig at an Illinois Country Fair.  The hog walked around a small ring and then laid lazily on his side until people voted on what colour ribbon he would receive.  He could have been related to a rhino and I was mesmerised by his size and demeanour.  This time around, I was mesmerised by healthy active pigs in their free-ranging environment.

In the Hemel-and-Aarde Valley, on Glen Oakes farm, we walked along the paths and dirt roads that wove through the pig’s grazing range.  We stopped by the fence to get a closer look at the tubby mammals and two large female pigs boldly came up to greet us. “You’d think they like their ears scratched but they love their eyes to be tickled” Julie explained, the owner of Glen Oakes Farm.  At the main house, Julie tallied and weighed our choices of Richard Bosman charcuterie, “You’ll see that the coppa is so well marbled which is due to our pigs having lots of space and room to roam around.”  It was the first time I was on a pig farm, witnessing the condition of the pig’s home, meeting the chocolate brown breeding boar, Major, and then consuming the charcuterie made from the raised pig’s at the Glen Oakes farm. Here’s more on the free-range to charcuterie story.

It was a fascinating full food cycle that turned the weekend into a foodie affair.  We roamed right back to the stone cottage with our basket of charcuterie, waving past the piglets and female pigs and made a platter of the chorizo, fennel sausage, cheese and artisan breads in front of the fire. We were truly consuming ethical charcuterie, except for our vegetarian Inge who proclaimed her clear conscious to all of us:) She took beautiful pictures of the surroundings with medium format film.

Our foodie night affair commenced with Three bean Raw Cilantro Salsa, Garlic Artisan Ciabatta, Butternut Soup, Fillet with Tomato Balsamic Relish and a handmade Lemon Tart.

Andrew’s plate

Breakfast was a mosaic of fresh fruit, grapefruit-orange cocktail to quench, farm scrambled eggs, slow roasted cherry tomatoes and rye bread from jason bakery.  Sixteen hands all contributed to fabulous feasts of farm fresh produce.  A love for slow homemade food was celebrated and spoke a language of appreciation for communal meals shared by friends, chew by chew.  Glen Oakes Guest Farm was also an inspiration and a positive example of how ethical food practices are an essential element to our food democracy.

Rooibos Rice with Smoked Paprika Mussels (Quick Paella-wanna-be)

In Recipe on December 1, 2010 at 12:03

Rooibos Rice with Paella-inspired flavours

I thought to myself, ‘How can I make a rice dish a little more interesting?’ So I started with the idea of color and decided to use all ‘red’ coloured ingredients in my kitchen. So first off, I made rooibos (redbush) tea-flavoured water to steam my brown rice.  I also took flavours commonly found in paella and used deliciously red: smoked paprika, cayenne, tomato paste, and red peppers, to add to the dish. The recipe goes a lil something like this:

2 cups of brown rice

4 cups water

4 rooibos teabags

1 medium onion

2 cloves of garlic

1 green pepper

1 medium carrot

half a red pepper

1 cup of rooibos tea

120 g tomato paste

170 g smoked mussels

Olive Oil

2 tsp cayenne pepper

1 TB smoked paprika

4 artichoke hearts

parsley for garnish

salt

pepper

Boil 4 cups water and add 4 bags of Rooibos tea. Add rice and reduce heat to a simmer.

In a deep large frying pan, cover the bottom of the pan with olive oil and let it heat on medium for 1 minute.  Add slices of onion and grated garlic and let them cook until soft and brown.  Add smoked paprika, cayenne pepper with salt and pepper to taste.  I accidentally added cayenne as if it were paprika and the flavour and spiciness was awesome, so don’t be afraid to add more heat if you can handle it.  Add the mussels and slices of carrot, green and red pepper to the oil and let them sit in the oil for minute.

Make a cup of roobis tea and mix the hot tea and tomato paste together in a bowl.  Add this mixture to the pan and stir.  When the rice is fully cooked, add the cooked rice to the frying pan mixture and stir in all the flavours together on a low heat.  Add the artichoke hearts and the fresh parsley for garnish and serve hot.  If there are left-overs be prepared for delicious marinated flavours dancing on your tongue-so much yummier than cold pizza…

Tip 1: If you can’t find little cans of smoked mussels, subsitute with smoked oysters, smoked sausage or smoked tofu.

Always consider flavouring your water when making rice.  Try jasmine tea or cinnamon sticks, anise or fennel!

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