Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘chocolate’

8 of the Tastiest Locally-Made Foods That Will Make Your Day | Cape Town, South Africa

In Friend's Kitchens, Travel on May 24, 2015 at 18:16

The Culinary Linguist-Cape Town best food listKeeping the love alive.

These 8 food creators in Cape Town, South Africa win my heart.  Yes, the list can go on and will.  But this is what comes to mind for now.  Guide yourself down this golden road of food happiness that #willmakeyourday and please share with me your favourites to add!

Cake-Bomb--the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena1. CupCake Richard 

Because everyone should eat cake or cupcakes.

If your tummy, tongue and tastebuds vary to the degree of “I can’t eat wheat, sugar, or carrots” then fear not –  you can eat these cakes.  Yes, I’m talking to you gluten-freedom fighters, etc out there.  Dive in.  They don’t exclude anyone.  They keep it fun and innovative with their recipes so ALL can enjoy.  Out of the kindness of their hearts (and yours), they take it upon themselve to cake bomb every last friday of the month to someone who deserves the love of 12 cupcakes personally delivered to them in Cape Town.  That is the coolest thing a baker could ever gift 🙂  Random Acts of Kindness!

#willmakeyourday 🙂

To get hold of some cake:

info@cupcakerichard.com   tel: 083 737 3417  Cape Town

ferdinando's Pizza- Culinary Linguist Cape Town Food list

Pizza Ferdinandos -the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena 2. Ferdinando’s Pizza (Hindi & the Shanico) & Garlic Aioli

Laughter, Peace, Pizza and Love.  This wood-burning pizzeria is a bubbly and beautiful dream come true.  Creators, Diego and Kimon, weave their joy and flavours into two beautiful places that serve wholesome, delicious and fantastical pizza and platters that leave you smiling inside and out.  Diego’s pizza dough is incomparable to the countless pizza houses around Cape Town – no one comes close to the crispy chewy sourdough crusts and the fun variety of pizza toppings. Check out the beginning of their story here and continue it for yourself at these spots:

  • 84 Kloof Street, Gardens, Cape Town
  • NEW!! 205 Lower Main Rd, Observatory, Cape Town
  • Pizza cape Town the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena084 771 0485 to book a table
  • ferdinandospizza@gmail.com  Tuesday to Saturday 6pm – 10pm on Kloof
  • Call for lunch & dinner hours for Observatory

Chocolate -the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena3. Soma Confection Custom Chocolates

The no-limit soldier of chocolate, Heather Thompson, is inspired by fun, quirky and delicious . . . chocolate creations.  This includes edible book pages, brains, and Darth Vader.  Amongst other things, when she’s not found spinning vinyls, dreaming and scheming apocalypse survival tips, she’s making your dreams come true in edible chocolate forms.  Ask about her 420 spa too!

072 632 7288  – Heather

Spinach Bread-the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena4. Espinaca Innovations Spinach Bread 

Popeye power in a bread loaf: Espinaca serves up freshly baked green bread with hints of cayenne and bay leaf to boost your nutrition and well-being.  Pair it up with their freshly pressed apple, pineapple and spinach juice.  Take home their spinach and feta muffins and spread their message to your friends.  The Spinach Bread King, Lufefe, has big plans and his green food movement is rolling out all over Cape Town.  Support!

No 42 Spine Road, Khayelitsha
Cape Town, Western Cape
073 095 0119 -Spinach Bread King, Lufefe

Mariam's Kitchen -the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena

5. Mariam’s Kitchen Salomies 

The flakey pastry, a.k.a Mariam’s rotis, is the type of dish that you crave when you are overseas.  Nothing else compares to the spices and hand-rolled dough that makes up these classic salomies.  Order a bean or steak masala salomie with your favourite fizzy drink to bring a taste of home cooking into your lunchtime.  Every crispy, gooey bite #willmakeyourday.

101 St George’s Mall Arcade, CBD.  7:30am -4pm

Oumeul Pies Cape Town - The Culinary Linguist by Athena

6. Oumeul Bakkery Pies

It all started on a road trip on the N2, Garden Route.  Pass by Riviersonderend and load up on the freshly baked spinach and cheese pies.  Whether it’s lamb, bobotie or chicken pie, the recipe and tradition #willmakeyourday in Cape Town at these locations:

14 Long Street CBD & Willowbridge

Peshwari naan-the culinary linguist -cape town food list by Athena

7.  Eastern Food Bazaar’s Peshwari Naan and Coconut Ice Cream

For the coconut lovers out there.  Dried grated coconut and ghee baked inside freshly prepared flatbread, then top it with coconut ice cream made with natural ingredients!  It’s a DIY gourmet combo in the middle of the bustling city arcade from noon til 11pm!

96 Longmarket St, Cape Town, 8001

Telephone: +27 21 461 2458.

Opening Hours: Monday to Thursday: 11:00am – 10:00pm. Friday & Saturday: 11:00am – 10:30pm

Cape Town bakeries-Lazari-the culinary linguist-Athena8.  Lazari’s Millionaire Squares & All-Day breakfast

Butter, sugar, chocolate alchemy at it’s best.  Chris and the team at Lazari are like the family you always wanted.  They make scrumptious baked goods, pies and daily specials in Vredehoek.  What #willmakeyourday is the daily baked goods by the cash register – buy at least six of the toffee Millionaire squares to take home after you’ve enjoyed a breakfast on a late Saturday morning.  Although this friendly neighbourhood cafe is famous for their white pink chocolate and vanilla cupcakes – I will never say no to the Millionaires!

Corner of Upper Maynard and Vredehoek Ave, Cape Town, 8001

hello @ lazari .co .za

021 461 9865

  • MON-FRI7.30am – 5pm
  • SAT-SUN8.30am – 4pm

Yes, and the list could go on . . .

Let me have it.

culinary linguist food list by Athena

photos are my own or jacked from the Google intraweb 🙂 Thanks!

Film Food – Documentary Stories of Cocoa, Life in Chocolate.

In Stories on August 1, 2014 at 22:35

First taste of chocolate.  Do you remember?  Remember the joy of opening a chocolate bar?

A journalist recently visited Cocoa farmers to film their first taste of chocolate.

Their reaction reminded me of the stories revealed by young child worker’s on cocoa farms in Ivory Coast in the Documentary: Semi-Sweet.

Re-post of a film review about the stories around the cocoa bean and chocolate. 

It’s 37 degrees in Paris while Patrick Roger’s chocolateir workshop is busy transporting his sculpture of a Orangutan made of chocolate.

Chocolate melts at 37 degrees, the same as our body’s temperature.  Roger explains: “Chocolate acts the way we do . . . It’s a love story.”  Roger’s story amongst others features in the food documentary: Semi-Sweet, Life in Chocolate.

Image It’s African premiere at the Durban International Film Festival gave viewers the chance to travel to three continents and hear multiple perspectives around the complex chocolate sphere.  The director, Michael Allcock and producer, Lalita Krishna immersed themselves in the art, politics, production and conflicting ideals on the chocolate coated topic. This documentary took four years to find the most compelling tales that showcase our relationships within the world of Chocolate.

“Someone promised us a better life  . . . And because of that we almost lost ours,” are the words from the young girls who chose to leave their home in Mali.  Many children are recruited to cross the border into Cote d’Ivoire for the promise of earning money on the cacao plantations.

Cote d’Ivoire produces nearly half of the world’s cacao and most are collected by the hands of young children. The film showcases the stories of youth who were lured by plantation recruiters to earn money that they could never imagine attaining if they stayed in their villages of Burkina Faso or Mali.  Most youths that chose to escape to a empty promise land lose their lives due to the conditions on the fields.  80% of pesticides used on the fields are banned in most countries and poison the workers, amongst other working hazards.

A young man who had survived the harsh conditions on the plantations was given some chocolate to taste after he confessed “Frankly, I do not know what they use cacao for.”

It reminded me of an image that speaks so clearly to what their stories portrayed:

Bustart image via GetGroundedTV

From the plantation field, “If you get tired, it’s not like you can rest.  There’s a quota and you have to get it.”

The film’s powerful choice to reveal the stories of these young workers allows viewers and activists to wake up to the real effect of consumer power, money and the faceted influence it has on lives that live close to the natural resource.

The truths of gross labour from the voices of these children reveal the dichotomy of youth that collect chocolate from pinatas, Halloween bags and Christmas stockings.

The film introduces the world of Hershey, Pennsylvania where Milton Hershey built a fictitious world that breeds naive ignorance since 1903.  Interviews with Hershey’s Public Relations and Marketing Managers expose a honest oblivion to the effects of mass corporate consumerism.  Hershey’s profile plays an interesting role in the film, as the town anthropomorphizes into both a naive narrow-minded child and the enabling greedy Uncle.

Sip through the jetstreams to Northern Ontario, Haliburton and your eyes and ears feast on the poetry of Ron and Nadine, raw food enthusiasts and producers of raw handmade chocolate concoctions of Living Libations.    “. . . They played and played until nectar was made.” exclaims Ron and his confessions of love for his craft.  Light-heartedly, I giggled during scenes of him marketing their ‘out of this world’ chocolate, to the NASA caterers for moon missions.  David Wolfe visits their Secret Land of Is, and dives into the food history of cacao, the value it had as currency until 1886 and the health benefits of this concentrated anti-oxidant tree.

Semi-sweet is Culinary Linguistics at the heart-using media to illustrate the language of chocolate that highlight the diverse realities on such a valuable food resource.  This is a great film to add to the top must-see food documentaries that evoke awareness and call for change.

Any suggestions of films, please share.   Here are some nice lists on great food sites: Lettuce Eat Kale, The Good Human

How to Eat and Think about Bug Grub: A Taste of Entomophagy

In Friend's Kitchens, Recipe, Stories on June 25, 2014 at 16:08

Would you ever say, “I’m a Entomo-tarian and love crickets roasted and tossed in sea salt and cayenne pepper and covered in chocolate?”

How to eat crickets -recipe

Chocolate covered Crickets at Soma Confection Laboratories. Pic by Heather Thompson

Considering bugs as grub gives way for the future of Pestaurants, cricket flour protein bars and stinkbug snacks being served in city centres across the globe.

With two other curious minds, adventurous taste buds and a love for food (with wings), we nibbled on cricket parts and chocolate-covered nosh once living in the wild.  Conversations about insect anatomy, and the future of entomophagy, got me thinking on the topic of the fast frozen-once-hopping jimineys.

My love for “how to” and DIY in culinary arts has led me to simmering  Mopani worms and foraging fresh sea vegetables. It’s my quest for promoting variety in our appetites, being a MacGyver in the kitchen and working with what you have and what is presented to you.  But will the high in protein, beneficial fatty acids, essential vitamins and micronutrients in insects become primary ingredients in our morning porridge?  I can see a future in dipping celery sticks in smoked paprika chickpea grasshopper pâté .

When will people from different hemispheres be sharing bug-eating habits?  Will you eat insects from your garden instead of using insecticide?

 Insects as a food source has been practiced for many generations in various parts of the world, and people are beginning to see past the gross factor.

Environmentally, insects take up less space, reproduce at a faster rate and have a better feed-to-meat ratio when compared to cattle and other alternative meat sources such as ostrich, goat, and pork.  Insects for human consumption could help in solving a wide range of ecological, economic and health related issues and concerns in our world of food production and nutrition.

But will you add it to your grocery list?

Will you start farming organic crickets instead of building a chicken coop?

As we continue to urbanise but become more wise and sovereign in our food choices, this may be your answer.

And people keep asking me, “So what do crickets taste like?”

This batch was a crispy, smokey grass with a chilli-chocolate punch in your mouth.  But if you’re looking to build your muscles, beetles are your super power protein source.

Stay tuned for Entomo – recipes as we expand our culinary linguistics together:  A Chocolate Confectioner, Agroecologist and a Culinary Nomad.  If you are chomping at the bit:  Eat a Bug Cookbooks are already on the shelves at an Amazon near you.

entomophagy in chocolate and spices How to eat crickets in chocolate -#theculinarylinguist

Crickets collected by AgroEcologist/Entomophager: Zayaan Khan.

How do crickets taste like in chocolate -#theculinarylinguist

Pop, Crunch and Chocolate with a side of Coco-nutty bar chocolate bar.

Semi-Sweet Film Food Documentary: Life in Chocolate

In Events on July 28, 2012 at 10:36

It’s 37 degrees in Paris while Patrick Roger’s chocolatier workshop is busy transporting his sculpture of a Orangutan made of chocolate.

Chocolate melts at 37 degrees, the same as our body’s temperature.  Roger explains: “Chocolate acts the way we do . . . It’s a love story.”  Roger’s story amongst others features in the food documentary: Semi-Sweet, Life in Chocolate.

Image It’s African premiere at the Durban International Film Festival gave viewers the chance to travel to three continents and hear multiple perspectives around the complex chocolate sphere.  The director, Michael Allcock and producer, Lalita Krishna immersed themselves in the art, politics, production and conflicting ideals on the chocolate coated topic. This documentary took four years to find the most compelling tales that showcase our relationships within the world of Chocolate.

“Someone promised us a better life  . . . And because of that we almost lost ours,” are the words from the young girls who chose to leave their home in Mali.  Many children are recruited to cross the border into Cote d’Ivoire for the promise of earning money on the cacao plantations.

Cote d’Ivoire produces nearly half of the world’s cacao and most are collected by the hands of young children. The film showcases the stories of youth who were lured by plantation recruiters to earn money that they could never imagine attaining if they stayed in their villages of Burkina Faso or Mali.  Most youths that chose to escape to a empty promise land lose their lives due to the conditions on the fields.  80% of pesticides used on the fields are banned in most countries and poison the workers, amongst other working hazards.

A young man who had survived the harsh conditions on the plantations was given some chocolate to taste after he confessed “Frankly, I do not know what they use cacao for.”

It reminded me of an image that speaks so clearly to what their stories portrayed:

Bustart image via GetGroundedTV

From the plantation field, “If you get tired, it’s not like you can rest.  There’s a quota and you have to get it.”

The film’s powerful choice to reveal the stories of these young workers allows viewers and activists to wake up to the real effect of consumer power, money and the faceted influence it has on lives that live close to the natural resource.

The truths of gross labour from the voices of these children reveal the dichotomy of youth that collect chocolate from pinatas, Halloween bags and Christmas stockings.

The film introduces the world of Hershey, Pennsylvania where Milton Hershey built a fictitious world that breeds naive ignorance since 1903.  Interviews with Hershey’s Public Relations and Marketing Managers expose a honest oblivion to the effects of mass corporate consumerism.  Hershey’s profile plays an interesting role in the film, as the town anthropomorphizes into both a naive narrow-minded child and the enabling greedy Uncle.

Sip through the jetstreams to Northern Ontario, Haliburton and your eyes and ears feast on the poetry of Ron and Nadine, raw food enthusiasts and producers of raw handmade chocolate concoctions of Living Libations.    “. . . They played and played until nectar was made.” exclaims Ron and his confessions of love for his craft.  Light-heartedly, I giggled during scenes of him marketing their ‘out of this world’ chocolate, to the NASA caterers for moon missions.  David Wolfe visits their Secret Land of Is, and dives into the food history of cacao, the value it had as currency until 1886 and the health benefits of this concentrated anti-oxidant tree.

Semi-sweet is Culinary Linguistics at the heart-using media to illustrate the language of chocolate that highlight the diverse realities on such a valuable food resource.  This is a great film to add to the top must-see food documentaries that evoke awareness and call for change.

Any suggestions of films, please share.   Here are some nice lists on great food sites: Lettuce Eat Kale, The Good Human

The Perfect Beach Snack: Nutella Loukoumades (Donuts) in Parga, Greece

In Stories, Travel on August 22, 2011 at 09:04

Nutella Doughnuts Loukoumades in Greece on The Culinary Linguist Blog

 You can’t get more indulgent than pouring Nutella over fried dough.  Well I wouldn’t mind adding fresh strawberries or crushed almonds into the mix.  Regardless, everyone around the world loves fried dough.  North Americans call it doughnuts, South Africans call it vetkoek, Greeks call it loukoumades.  But not everyone pours Nutella over it.  My friend Georgia took me to Parga, a small coastal town in Northwestern Greece.  We spiraled down the mountain to the beach and swam into the chilling fresh sea. After the dip we shared some beers on the deck of her favorite bar that overlooked Parga’s harbour. She decided before we hit the road we should get Nutella loukoumades for the ride home to Ioannina.  “Yes!” I exclaimed.  We giggled as the storekeeper drizzled the chocolate over the bitesize doughnuts. We skipped through the narrow streets with our road trip snack in hand.  The elderly lady with the fruit stand told us her grapes were just as sweet but we shyly replied that we spent our last euro pennies on our Nutella treat.  Who would have thought that hot oil, dough and chocolate could make grown-up girls skip and squeal. It’s official, I’ll never say no to Nutella or to Nutella with loukoumades.  Maybe next time I’ll throw some grapes in the mix.

Parga Beach on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Greece

Homemade Chocolate in a Jar

In Recipe, Stories on February 14, 2011 at 13:43

 

The source of love in chocolate

Breakfast on Valentine’s day involved me, a spoon and my Love Source jar. This chocolate is goddessa concoction of coconut oil, cacao, agave syrup and vanilla pod with niblets of an orange essence. It’s from the ladies of I Heart Life Outside The Box where poetry and chocolate unite  just in time for Valentine’s Day. This is definitely a fine example of food language love. Viva homemade superfood chocolate! Happy Valentine’s Day with wishes and kisses from a lover of Love Source.

 

World Nutella Day

In Stories, Travel on February 7, 2011 at 14:20

 

Feb. 5th is World Nutella Day and it’s a surprise that I missed it. I had a love affair with Nutella in 2003 and it lasted til 2005. During that time I was the main author of “How to incorporate Nutella into 3 meals a day” the sub-title should have been “how to gain weight and keep it on for as long as possible with a smile on your face”. I think the hazelnut oil gave a glow to my completion . . .

My typical love affair with Nutella went like this:

For breakfast: Toast with Nutella and freshly sliced pear

Lunch: Nutella and banana crepes

Dinner: Nutella, Apple and Peanut Butter sandwich

Dessert: Nutella on a spoon.

There was at least one meal a day that involved Nutella and me.  It all started in Paris, while I was traveling with friends.  We were backpackers, hustlers, and on a cheese and baguette shoestring budget.  We were in an internet cafe that had huge jars of Nutella on display as decor in a quiet corner.  Naughty as we were, we decided that one missing from the shelf wouldn’t put them back. Yes-we stole the Nutella jar, the biggest jar we had ever seen!  Between the three of us, we now had a sweet hazelnut spread  to add to our cheese and baguette diet in Paris.

Karma caught up with me since I became addicted to the smooth hazelnut flavour of Nutella and I couldn’t shake it for two years.  I never knew anything was wrong with eating Nutella everyday until I came to South Africa.  Nutella wasn’t as readily available as I was used to and so it slowly slipped out of my everyday and never rushed back into my kitchen cupboard.  I still love you Nutella and am happy you have found  a day in this world for me to celebrate your existence.  Thanks to David Lebovitz’s blog of food in Paris I can attempt to make my own version of you.

If you are a Nutella virgin, then meet Ms Adventures in Italy.  She will give you 50 ways to celebrate the spread of Nutella and help you identity what archetype of Nutella-lover you are.  As for me, I’ll be having a belated-celebration because between you and me, everyday is World Nutella Day.

© David Lebovitz


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