Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘Flour’

How to Eat and Think about Bug Grub: A Taste of Entomophagy

In Friend's Kitchens, Recipe, Stories on June 25, 2014 at 16:08

Would you ever say, “I’m a Entomo-tarian and love crickets roasted and tossed in sea salt and cayenne pepper and covered in chocolate?”

How to eat crickets -recipe

Chocolate covered Crickets at Soma Confection Laboratories. Pic by Heather Thompson

Considering bugs as grub gives way for the future of Pestaurants, cricket flour protein bars and stinkbug snacks being served in city centres across the globe.

With two other curious minds, adventurous taste buds and a love for food (with wings), we nibbled on cricket parts and chocolate-covered nosh once living in the wild.  Conversations about insect anatomy, and the future of entomophagy, got me thinking on the topic of the fast frozen-once-hopping jimineys.

My love for “how to” and DIY in culinary arts has led me to simmering  Mopani worms and foraging fresh sea vegetables. It’s my quest for promoting variety in our appetites, being a MacGyver in the kitchen and working with what you have and what is presented to you.  But will the high in protein, beneficial fatty acids, essential vitamins and micronutrients in insects become primary ingredients in our morning porridge?  I can see a future in dipping celery sticks in smoked paprika chickpea grasshopper pâté .

When will people from different hemispheres be sharing bug-eating habits?  Will you eat insects from your garden instead of using insecticide?

 Insects as a food source has been practiced for many generations in various parts of the world, and people are beginning to see past the gross factor.

Environmentally, insects take up less space, reproduce at a faster rate and have a better feed-to-meat ratio when compared to cattle and other alternative meat sources such as ostrich, goat, and pork.  Insects for human consumption could help in solving a wide range of ecological, economic and health related issues and concerns in our world of food production and nutrition.

But will you add it to your grocery list?

Will you start farming organic crickets instead of building a chicken coop?

As we continue to urbanise but become more wise and sovereign in our food choices, this may be your answer.

And people keep asking me, “So what do crickets taste like?”

This batch was a crispy, smokey grass with a chilli-chocolate punch in your mouth.  But if you’re looking to build your muscles, beetles are your super power protein source.

Stay tuned for Entomo – recipes as we expand our culinary linguistics together:  A Chocolate Confectioner, Agroecologist and a Culinary Nomad.  If you are chomping at the bit:  Eat a Bug Cookbooks are already on the shelves at an Amazon near you.

entomophagy in chocolate and spices How to eat crickets in chocolate -#theculinarylinguist

Crickets collected by AgroEcologist/Entomophager: Zayaan Khan.

How do crickets taste like in chocolate -#theculinarylinguist

Pop, Crunch and Chocolate with a side of Coco-nutty bar chocolate bar.

Oat Milk Pancakes with Peach and Pear Syrup

In Recipe on March 22, 2011 at 09:09

This isn’t a vegan recipe but it can be.  It’s an alternative pancake recipe when you look into your fridge and realize the milk is all gone.  You’re still in your pajamas, too hungry to wait in a check-out line at the grocery store, so your creativity kicks in and you make a plan.

How to make Oat Milk

With a coffee grinder, grind ½ cup of oats until it becomes flour/powder. To make oat flour by the cup, add 2-3 tablespoons of the flour in a bottle and 1 cup room temperature water.  Shake the bottle so the flour disperses evenly.  Refrigerate and shake before using.

Oat-milk Tahini Pancakes with Peach-Pear syrup

1 cup stone ground brown bread wheat flour

1 cup oat milk

1 T tahini (high source in calcium)

1 T oil

1 egg

1 t baking soda

1 T sugar

½ t salt

Makes 3-4 pancakes.

Peach-Pear Syrup

1 ripe peach

1 ripe pear

2 T butter

⅓ sugar

Add your oil, egg, tahini and oat milk together and whisk.  Mix the sugar, salt, baking soda and flour together.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix together to make a batter.

Heat your griddle on high coated with a light layer of butter.  Pour one ladle of the pancake batter into the middle of the hot griddle and let it spread evenly.  Turn the pancake over when you start seeing bubbles form.  Flip the pancake and let it cook on the other side for 15 seconds.  Remove the pancake and place on a plate and place in a warming drawer.  Repeat until all the batter is used up.

Heat a small sauce pan on high and melt the butter.  Dice the peach and the pear keeping the juices from cutting the fruit.  Add the diced fruit and juice to the sauce pan and stir the melted butter evenly around the fruit.  Add sugar and let it simmer for 4-8 minutes until a syrupy consistency forms.  Remove from heat and pour over pancakes.  Eat and enjoy immediately.  Garnish with fresh cream and mint.

Bread with Gluten-free Flours

In Recipe on October 29, 2010 at 13:19

 

the goodness

 

I love bread and anything to do with starch-carbs. This recipe doesn’t exclude Celiac-disease tummies out there because there is still hope if you can get your hands on stone-ground wheat flour and mix bread recipes with other gluten-free grains. I’v experimented with gluten-free grains for awhile but, for me, nothing compares to just whole grain wheat bread. This recipe contains a mix of grain goodness baked into a loaf of crusty outside and a soft spongey bed on the inside.

The recipe:

400 ml stone-ground wheat flour

300 ml digestive bran

100 ml quinoa flour

200 ml kasha (buckwheat groats) flour

10g/1 sachet of instant yeast

1 TB ml sugar

1 TB ml salt

luke warm water (300ml)

 

Mixing the water into the dry ingredients

Mix the instant yeast and sugar with 100 ml of lukewarm water. Mix them and watch it froth up.  Mix all the dry ingredients together in a bowl and make a well in the middle.  Pour the sugar, water, yeast mix in the well and start merging the dry ingredients into the well of wet ingredients.  Gradually add more lukewarm water and mix.  Mix in the water and gradually mix the ingredients together until you have an elastic dough. Knead for 5 minutes.  Allow to rise in a warm draft-free place covering the bowl with a towel or dish cloth. Whole-wheat or mixed flour breads take longer to rise so be patient. Once the dough has doubled in size, knead it again briefly.  Sprinkle the pan with oats or poppy seeds and a light coat of oil and put the dough in medium sized bread pan.

 

Bake at 200 C for 15 minutes and then 180 for 45 minutes.

 

Tip 1: Use a coffee grinder to make grain flours.  I rarely use my coffee grinder for coffee beans but if you do then it may be worth getting a second-hand grinder for cooking/baking purposes so your ingredients don’t take on the flavor of cafe. The grinder makes a fine flour to anything and motivates creativity when experimenting with ingredients!

 

fresh bread out of the oven

 

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