Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘salad’

Easy Spicy Zesty Sweet Chickpea Salad Recipe

In Recipe on June 27, 2013 at 14:34

Easy-Pineapple-Carrot-Chickpea-Salad-The Culinary-Linguist

What happens when you juice pineapples, carrots and fresh green serrano chiles?

A spunky zesty salad with sweet and spicy flavours can be created to fuel you through the day.   Last week, we bought lots of great farm produce from the City Bowl Market.

Back at home, I put pineapple and carrots and threw in a couple fresh green serrano chiles into the juicer to see if anything would come out.  Some great juice was made, but the pulp left inside was looking equally nutritious and delicious.

Spontaneous creations is how I would describe my kitchen technique.  I love creating recipes that make ordinary whole foods into unique delicious dishes.  Like James Beard once said, “When cook, you never stop learning.  That’s the fascination of it.”  With any chance to experiment in my kitchen with fresh ingredients, I let the space between mistakes and alchemy emerge.  Adding chiles into the juicer seemed natural and somehow, necessary.

I’ve shared some fun recipes before that have worked out great like: Strawberry-Beetroot Flapjacks, and Banana-Pecan Sorbet.  When creations in the kitchen lead to easy vibrant dishes, I get excited to share them with you.  Here’s what happened when I decided to juice green chiles with pineapples and carrots:

 The Spicy Zesty Sweet Chickpea Salad

Instead of throwing the pulp from the centrifugal juice extractor away or into your compost bin, try adding it to recipes like this one:

Juice and fiber of three medium sized carrots

 Juice and fiber of half a small pineapple

 Juice and fiber of two green serrano chiles

 Juice of and fiber of large lemon and zest

500 grams of sprouted or cooked chickpeas  (garbanzo beans)

1 finely chopped fresh red pepper

1 finely chopped red onion

1 diced roma tomato

Salt, pepper and cumin to taste

Handful of fresh cilantro leaves and stems, finely chopped dhania

Handful of coarsely crushed unsalted cashews

2 Haas avocados

Easy-Pineapple-Carrot-Chickpea-Salad-The Culinary-LinguistJuice the carrots, pineapple, chillies, and lemon in a juicer (with any centrifugal, one-gear, etc).  Empty the juice into a large mixing bowl, and scrape the pulp from inside the juicer into the same bowl.  Add the diced tomato, red pepper, chickpeas, onion, salt, cumin, pepper and lemon zest into the bowl with juice and pulp.  Mix well and let it sit and marinate for 20 minutes.  Mix dhania into the salad, leaving some leaves for garnish.

Cut the avocados into half and remove the flesh from the avocado shell.  Slice the avocado into long slices.  Scoop the salad into the halves of the avocado shell as an appetizer serving bowl.  Place avocado slices and dhania leaves on top as garnish.  Enjoy!  The salad can definitely be stored in the fridge and be enjoyed the following day.

Tip:  It’s best to stir in the dhania and avocado when you plan to serve and eat it immediately.

Recipe: How to Make Spring Roll-Nori Wraps

In Recipe on May 19, 2013 at 01:19

The Culinary Linguist | How to make for Spring Roll Nori WrapsThis Nori (seaweed) wrap recipe is an alternative to spring rolls.  It’s perfect for getting a balance of essential vitamins into your diet.  It’s also delicious and beautiful to share at picnics and parties.  It pleases: vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, and my dad who likes to live on garlic and lamb chops will even chow these as a snack.

 Be creative with your ingredients and substitute with what you have fresh around you and what’s in season.  I used what was at the farmer’s market and what happened to be growing in the garden, and fresh ingredients already in our kitchen.  Perhaps drinking 8 glasses of water a day isn’t necessary when we eat predominantly fresh and raw meals throughout the day.  This recipe won’t disappoint.

What you need:

 Packet of  10 or more Sushi Nori (Seaweed) Sheets.

Put in a food processor or finely chop:

1 medium sized red pepper

1 medium sized yellow pepper

1 medium sized carrot

1/2 cup sprouted mung beans

5 baby broccoli stalks

5 small kale leaves (dinosaur or black)

5 Nasturtium leaves

1/2 cup fresh coriander leaves and stalks (dhania)
The Culinary Linguist | Use Fresh Ingredients for Spring Roll Nori Wraps

Optional ingredients:

Avocado (add it later instead of putting it in the processor)

1/2 apple to add a juicy sweet taste

1 TB Korean bean paste for a savoury flavour

1/4 cup cooked rice vermicilli noodles

1/4 cup fresh papaya or mango (not too ripe)

Any type of sprouts: sunflower, lentils, etc

* If you add tomatoes or lemon juice, the moisture from the filling will cause the nori sheet to be too wet and break.  If this happens, just double the nori sheets.

 The Culinary Linguist | Use Fresh Ingredients for Spring Roll Nori WrapsDipping Sauce:Add ingredients together and whisk until smooth:2 TB natural peanut butter

2 TB Mirin sauce

2 tsp sesame oil

2 tsp soy sauce

1/2 tsp fresh grated ginger

1/4 tsp fresh green chili (optional)

Take out one sheet of Nori paper and lay it down on the smooth side of a plate.  Take about 1/3 cup of the finely chopped vegetables and spread it around on the bottom half (4 inches-10cm) of the nori, leave an inch (3 cm) on each side.  There should be about 5 inches of clean nori on top.  Fold the 3 cm on each side towards the middle of the nori sheet and start rolling the length of the nori towards the top keeping the filling tight and together and the sides tucked in.  Essentially it is a similar technique to roll a spring roll or burrito.   As the nori sheet rolls to the top, and the filling is wrapped under the nori, dampen the top of the nori that is laying flat on the plate and roll the rest of the nori toward the damp part, sealing the roll into a perfect little edible nori wrap.

The Culinary Linguist | Use Fresh Ingredients for Spring Roll Nori WrapsTo skip the rolling technique, make a cone out of the nori and then spoon and pack the finely chopped vegetable filling inside.

Place dipping sauce in a small bowl.  Cut the spring roll nori wraps in the middle and arrange them on a plate or platter with the dipping sauce.  Taste one and then serve them immediately!

Eating Kale:Yuppie-Guilt or Social Tool for change?

In Recipe, Stories, Travel on April 9, 2013 at 15:02

Ingredients for Kale SaladI recently came across a blog post that said “20-things-everyone-thinks-about-the-food-world-but-nobody-will-say.If you’re a kale-loving, politically correct “foodie” interested in CSAs, molecular gastronomy, and not getting your bubble burst, run away now—shit’s about to get real.

It went on to say some pretty funny, real and ridiculous shit and brought up statements like: Locavorism has become the newest outlet for yuppie guilt, providing a feeling of living ethically and supporting a cause, but too often the onslaught of kale and artisanal pickles blinds us from looking at the deeper problems affecting America’s food system.

Ya, but.  Eating more kale, is the start to actively changing a problem affecting America’s health system, consumption, which then indirectly changes modern food systems around the world if we access our food from community soil sources around us.  Yes, Urbanism is all around and people live on sand deposited land in and outside of global cities.  But let’s be real with the small steps one can take: The more we learn about our food, where it comes from and why, consume home-grown and home-made food, and understand the need for changes in our large modern food systems (globally -it’s not only an North American plague anymore) -the more we return to our natural existence with food, which will grow each of us into more kale-loving citizens that use food as a positive tool for social change.

Food is a canvas that allows us to address issues interconnected in our societies, and let kale be the paintbrush that communicates our awareness and need for change from the dependency on our modern food systems.  What we do to get our food and make our food can make us think about our resources differently, interact with them differently, can shape the world differently, and then replicate actions into positive productive kale-loving urban cities.  Check out Edible Green Route and Carolyn Steel’s Hungry City for some food activist reading.

So on that note, I’m sharing a recipe from my kale-loving cousin Connie, who is most likely to be found eating at Noma or getting kale from her CSA basket in Chicago and making this delicious kale salad:

1 bunch dinosaur kale/Lacinato kale/black kale

1 shallot, finely diced

spoonful of dijon mustard

white wine vinegar

extra virgin olive oil

Juice of one whole lemon (sometimes a bit more)

1 clove garlic, minced

1 anchovy, minced

salt and pepper to taste

Panko or breadcrumbs toasted

Pecorino Romano

Remove stems from the kale and roughly chop into ribbons

Toast panko crumbs until dark brown

Dinosaur or black kale in a colanderHow to make a kale salad with lemon mustard dressingBlend the ingredients for Kale salad dressing In blender, emulsify shallts, dijon mustard, white wine vinegar, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, lemon juice, garlic and anchovy.  You can also just whisk all together if you don’t feel like using the blender.

Let the dressing sit on the kale for awhile (an hour or so) to soften the kale a little bit.  When ready to serve, toss the toasted Panko crumbs and grate the Pecorino Romano (you can also use parmesan instead).

Alternatives:  I added some flax seed oil to the dressing and then grated fresh carrot because I didn’t have cheese.

Kale Salad and Mustard lemon dressing

South Africa’s West Coast Pomegranate and Peppercorn Salad

In Recipe, Travel on March 25, 2013 at 13:05

Peppercorn salad with PomegranatepeppercornsongroundWestCoastculinarylinguistathenalamberisWest Coast South Africa shade in VerlorenvleiPicking pomegranates in South AfricaThe Culinary Linguist's West Coast getaway #bliss

Soul smiles and surf-sore shoulders leave me mindful and replete. A montage of new faces smiling in the heat. Moon memories and salted dreams sail me through the Monday office beat.

 Yes, let’s strike out into the open, where wild places await. Let’s turn off the cell phones, leave our city behind. Let’s forget the time, and live by the heat of the earth. Let’s let this be the last update, sent into space. 

 I’ll be gone for a while, a moment, a week. To a place with a river, long grass and a beach. – Chris Mason, writer, poet, wildlife filmmaker, my husband:)

We set out to the West Coast, Verlorenvlei near Elandsbay (Elaandsbaai).  With family and friends, the rhythm of the day revolves around the wind patterns and the sun’s heat. At nightfall we light candles, build fires and cook up our communal meals of with mains of snoek, crayfish, mutton, or boerewors.

During the early autumn days on Uithoek farm, red fruits become ripe and our little fingers come to collect them.  One of my all-time favorite, is the pomegranate’s regal rubies that continue to bear fruit until mid autumn.  The other is a tree berry that I recognized from knowing it inside a grinder.  The hanging rainbow peppercorn trees are gifts of shade on the Uithoek farm with their big green wispy branches alongside the farm cottages.  The burst of flavor from the tiny rainbow peppercorn is a medley of fragrant clove, frankincense and cardamom resemblance.  I couldn’t resist some country fruit foraging and harvested a few jars to experiment with some new culinary creations and combinations.  I really love the way the pomegranate and rainbow peppercorn are both powerful little kernels of red fantastic flavor accents.

This is my scrumptious salad recipe I’ve been enjoying this week, bursting with tantalizing flavor combinations.

Pomegranate Salad Recipe in South AfricaWest Coast Candlelight feast in South AfricaWestCoastculinarylinguistathenalamberisFeasting by Candlelight on The Culinary Linguist blog



Pomegranate and Peppercorn Salad Recipe:

200 grams of crisp mixed garden lettuce/watercress/beetroot leaves, etc

1/4 cup fresh pomegranate kernels

1/2 tsp fresh rainbow peppercorns

1/8 cup pumpkin seeds

1/4 cup pecans

1 soft ripe plum or small pear

1/8 cup Danish blue cheese

Dressing:

1 TB tahini

2 TB apple cider vinegar

1 tsp hemp powder

In a small bowl add tahini, hemp powder and apple cider vinegar.  Whisk together.  Wash and rinse the lettuce leaves and plum.  Cut the plum in small bite-size pieces.  Crumble the danish blue cheese.  Toast your pecans and pumpkin seeds until golden brown in a frying pan (the pumpkin seeds will start making crackling sound), then remove from the heat.  Cut open the pomegranate and remove the fresh red pomegranate kernels by removing all the white pith that covers and connects the kernels together.  Add all the ingredients together into a large bowl and drizzle the dressing over.  Toss the salad so all the ingredients are evenly distributed.

Enjoy the delicious crunch of pomegranates and rainbow peppercorns in this nutritious salad!

Nourishing traditions on The Culinary Linguist's blog

The Culinary Linguist's road trip up the West Coast South Africa #travelThe Culinary Linguist's DIY hammock The Culinary Linguist's relaxing getaway in South Africa

The Culinary Linguist's West Coast relaxing weekend #farm

firemakingWestCoastculinarylinguistathenalamberis

What to Eat when Visiting Greece’s villages: Nourishing Food Traditions

In Stories, Travel on February 5, 2012 at 13:24

Greek village food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece   Summertime and road tripping lead to some of my favorite food adventure memories.  In Greece, you can drive on national highways and come across Greek village tavernas that serve greek horiatiki salads under grapevines.  Roadside stalls are piled with local fresh, dried, and preserved food that have been made and celebrated for centuries.  Tradition, food sovereignty, and pride for fresh Greek food is celebrated in most Greek villages you visit.  It certainly reigns true in the Greek village of my Greek summer food memories, Alepohori.  My grandmother, Yiayia Chrissy was born there, and I have grown to know the similar tastes and smells she must have enjoyed in her youth. From the chestnut tree forests and oregano-lined mountains, everything was grown organically and families shared the fruits of the Arcadian soil.  Visiting Alepohori today provides me with hundreds of simple food pleasures.  Today, I am sharing a few of my many favorites that you can enjoy.

1. Drink Ouzo.   If you can find local and homemade, even better.  In the village, drinking ouzo is pastime and for some . . . an immune booster 😉 You could claim that walking down to the tavern or to your neighbour’s house for  glass of ouzo on the hill is the reason why people live to 100 here, not to mention consuming a fresh medley of mezedes everyday.   If you like to enjoy long afternoons with traditional tiny plates of food and company from your neighbours, drink ouzo.

Greek Ouzo on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

2. Pick figs and eat them.  If you are lucky enough to be in Greece during the months of July, August, September then you will be in wild food harvesting heaven.

Greek figs on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

3.  Keep an eye out for summer fruit trees.  A simple mountain walk in the afternoon will lead you to picking fresh public produce from the fruit trees.  Below is a modest harvest of bite size Grecian yellow plums.

Picking plums on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek village cats on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

4.  Visit the local cheese dairy and choose the best tasting Feta made from Goat’s milk.  If there are different cheese varieties, buy a small portion of Manouri cheese and fry it up on a skillet at home.

ImageGreek food and cheese on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceImage

5. Pick fresh tomatoes from the vine and prepare a traditional Greek village salad:

 Greek salad recipe

2 large tomatoes (cut into bite size chunks)

Put in a medium-sized bowl and add salt to taste.  Toss the tomatoes so the salt draws out the juices.

Add a half a long thin cucumber (cut into half slices)

1/4 of red onion (cut into thin slices)

1/2 green pepper (cut into thin slices)

Mix the salad together.

Drizzle Extra Virgin Olive Oil over the salad and a pinch of fresh or dried oregano.

1 slice of your fresh feta cheese (portion to your desire)

Place feta on top of the salad and sprinkle more oregano and drizzle more oil.

Add 5-7  marinated olives to the salad.

Grab forks and dive in.

(Note: Once you’ve finished you salad, leave an extra piece of Greek village bread and soak up all the golden juice: salt, tomato juice, oil and oregano, leaving your bowl clean.

Greek salad on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece #recipe

6.  Visit the local farms in the village.  Most are private plots and operate on biodynamic systems that yields incredible organic produce, beautiful to photograph and even tastier to eat straight from ground.

Greek food and natural farms on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Greek food and honey on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Be sure to taste honey made in the Peloponnesus mountains

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece
Greek men on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece
Greek child on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek donkey on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek Sunflower on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

7.  Find out where your honey comes from.  Greek honey is so fragrant that getting a chance to see where all the flowers are in bloom makes your next spoonful a visual and sensory treat and a proud locavore.

Greek bread on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

8. Buy Greek village bread.  Next to Alepohori, there is another village, Blakhokeresia, that makes delicious authentic bread.

9.  Learn from your grandmothers.  Every house you visit, or path you cross is an opportunity to learn, taste and enjoy traditional and personal Greek food favorites.  Practice your culinary linguistics and enjoy the range of hospitality that is shown through the food and culture.  Greek village woman on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

10.  Share a delicious Greek village lunch feast with family and neighbors.  Digest it all by taking a nap-preferably in a hammock, underneath the chestnut trees.

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Souvlaki, rice, Greek Salad, baked lemon oven potatoes, sauteed tomato and green beans and anything else that may get piled onto your plate. It will be tasty!

Greek food and village on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

A Durban Curry Bunny Chow Heat Feast in Cape Town

In Events, Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on January 15, 2012 at 09:34

Durban Curry Bunny Chow on The Culinary Linguist Blog #South AfricaClimate change and Durban curry?  What do they have in common?

It’s the only meal that will cool you down when a sub-tropical heatwave rolls through Cape Town.  A humid blanket covered the the whole city.  To survive the heat, we consumed the heat.  We invited our friends and a self-proclaimed Durban curry chef to bring their favorite curry ingredients, unsliced white bread and their swimming costumes.  Together, we sat by the pool regulating our body temperatures until the heat feast began.  Here’s a sneak peak of all the spicy humid harmony that was sprinkled

around the house:

Durban Curry Bunny Chow Pool Party on The Culinary Linguist Blog #South Africa

Pimm’s lemonade and soda

Olives, kuhestan’s persoan pickled lime served with cucumber slices

Banana, coconut sambal

Raita

Onion, tomato, dhania, red/yellow/green pepper/red cabbage with lemon or rice vinegar

Nice ‘n Spicy Natal Indian Masala Curry

Guy cooked for ten of us in two pots, frying the onions in oil until golden brown, together with garlic and ginger and the spices from Nice ‘n Spice.

Keeping it orginal and true to Durban bunny chow, there was chicken and potato added and cooked together to make a nice thick curry stew.

Here is a sample recipe to try at home as per Nice ‘n Spicy spice packets:

1 kg diced beef, mutton or chicken

1/4 cup oil for frying

2 chopped medium onions

4 cloves garlic crushed

1 small piece ginger root grated

10 curry leaves optional

1 tsp salt

1 TB sugar

2 large ripe tomatoes chopped

4 potatoes peeled and cubed

1/4cup chopped coriander leaves

15 grams Nice ‘n Spicy Masala curry mix

Courtesy of www.agnet.co.za/nicenspice

Curry is best if cooked the day before and allowed to develop its full flavour overnight in the refrigerator.  We didn’t wait and left no curry drop behind.  We used bread as our utensils and wiped every flavour from the dishes clean.

Check out the behind the scenes on the slideshow:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It’s not Rabbit Food, It’s Rainbow Raw Salsa Salad.

In Recipe on November 9, 2011 at 12:34

Call it rabbit food, but it is damn delicious and surprisingly filling too.  Inspired by Raw-vember, I made a spicy salad that is bright and tangy in flavour and festive on the eye.

Raw Salsa Salad on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

This is a super quick, easy and yummy crunch salad that has major nutrients because it is a whole bunch of raw vegetables and fruit at its best.  It can easily be a dish in a non-raw setting and served with tortilla chips and used as a salsa or sambal to any main dish.

I recently bought an organic cold-pressed Omega 3-6-9 (Hemp, Sesame, Pumpkinseed, Flax) oil blend and added that to the raw ingredients thanks to Crede Oils.  It gave a delicious but different flavour instead of using extra virgin olive oil.

Try this recipe out with whatever produce is freshest in your fridge but this combination is a great balance of colour and flavour.

Rainbow Salsa Salad: a Raw food discovery

2 Roma tomatoes

1 large carrot

1/4 red onion

1/2 lemon with peel

1 yellow pepper

1 Serrano chile

1 kiwi

2 tablespoons of Crede’s Omega 3-6-9 Oil

Salt and Pepper to taste

2 TB sunflower seeds

Wash your vegetables and fruit thoroughly and quarter the tomatoes, carrot, onion, yellow pepper, lemon and chile. (Leave the chile out if you don’t want the kick)  Put all in a food processor and pulse for 6 seconds so they have been chopped in small chewable pieces.  Place chopped vegetables and fruit into a bowl and drizzle Omega 3-6-9 oil.  Put salt and pepper and sunflower seeds on top and stir until the salad is coated in the oil, salt and pepper and the sunflowers are distributed around.  Garnish with slices of kiwi.  Eat immediately. Enjoy the chew!

Raw Spicy Salsa Salad on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

Diego’s Fish Festival Birthday in De Waterkant

In Events, Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on April 3, 2011 at 22:23

When you meet Kimon and Diego, you’ll understand that when they throw a birthday party it becomes a street feast festival of seafood, love, family and friends.   On Sunday afternoon, there were four generations of family and friends, sharing steamed paprika-cream mussels out of the pot and apricot-butter fish fresh off the BBQ under the shady hibiscus trees in De Waterkant, Cape Town.

Finger food: dunk your bread in the pot and top it off with a marinated mussel

When I entered the kitchen, there were six friends already preparing an element to the feast; boiling the potatoes, chopping the parsley, crushing garlic, etc.

Preparing the Octopus potato salad

Diego was in the kitchen with a cold Corona in one hand, and a kilo of fresh octopus in the other.  He confirmed that, “Everything made in this kitchen is made with love,” he exclaimed, enjoying the bustle of his kitchen and wearing his pinstripe apron with a hand-sewn felt caricature of Kimon and Diego’s dog, Ferdinando.

Linguine con le vongole

The food that was brought, shared and prepared for Diego’s fish festival birthday party was a testament to how handmade food caters love to everyone’s digestive system.

We celebrated that Sunday with Kimon as our menu MC, hosting popping flavours, beautiful friends in a breathtaking city for what I hope becomes an annual feeshy street birthday festival of shared handmade feasts and love.

Kimon's kitchen graffiti

Crispy flaky philo quejo cups, wish I had more than just one!

The traveling mussel pot of white wine and creme deliciousness. Avô picking his share of the mussels

MC Kimon and Catch of the Day: Diego

Yes thats a gem squash serving as a bowl for mussel stew

a spicy tomato mussel pot

 

raw salsa appetiser on rye crackers

Recipe for Raw Salsa on Crackers:

2 fresh tomatoes

1 onion

1 small bunch of scallions

1 can of corn

3 TB olive oil

1 carrot

sprinkle of salt, pepper, cumin and parsley

Grate tomatoes and onion into a fresh pulp.  Chop scallions and add to the tomato and onion mixture.  Stir in one washed can of corn and chopped scallions.  Add oil, salt, pepper, parsley and cumin to taste.  Spread out rye crackers on a platter and dish one spoonful of the salsa on the crackers.  Grate thin strips of carrot and sprinkle as garnish over the salsa.  Serve immediately to hungry guests.

Salsa feasting

Recipe for Diego’s Octopus Potato Salad:

1 kilo octopus

1 large bunch of fresh parsley

8 potatoes

4 finely chopped cloves of garlic

Clean and pound the octopus to make the meat tender.  Boil water and dunk the octopus in the water at 2-3 second intervals 5 times.  Once octopus is cooked enough to not break the muscles down in your jaw, cut the tentacles and body into bite-sizes pieces.  Put them in a large bowl with  the garlic and salt/pepper  and olive oil to taste.  Cut the potatoes into bite-size chunks and boil until soft. Drain the potatoes and add them to the octopus. Stir and mix in the fresh parsley, adding more oil and salt to taste.  Serve with freshly ground pepper or a drizzle of red wine vinegar.

 

Octopus salad

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