Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘raw’

Easy Spicy Zesty Sweet Chickpea Salad Recipe

In Recipe on June 27, 2013 at 14:34

Easy-Pineapple-Carrot-Chickpea-Salad-The Culinary-Linguist

What happens when you juice pineapples, carrots and fresh green serrano chiles?

A spunky zesty salad with sweet and spicy flavours can be created to fuel you through the day.   Last week, we bought lots of great farm produce from the City Bowl Market.

Back at home, I put pineapple and carrots and threw in a couple fresh green serrano chiles into the juicer to see if anything would come out.  Some great juice was made, but the pulp left inside was looking equally nutritious and delicious.

Spontaneous creations is how I would describe my kitchen technique.  I love creating recipes that make ordinary whole foods into unique delicious dishes.  Like James Beard once said, “When cook, you never stop learning.  That’s the fascination of it.”  With any chance to experiment in my kitchen with fresh ingredients, I let the space between mistakes and alchemy emerge.  Adding chiles into the juicer seemed natural and somehow, necessary.

I’ve shared some fun recipes before that have worked out great like: Strawberry-Beetroot Flapjacks, and Banana-Pecan Sorbet.  When creations in the kitchen lead to easy vibrant dishes, I get excited to share them with you.  Here’s what happened when I decided to juice green chiles with pineapples and carrots:

 The Spicy Zesty Sweet Chickpea Salad

Instead of throwing the pulp from the centrifugal juice extractor away or into your compost bin, try adding it to recipes like this one:

Juice and fiber of three medium sized carrots

 Juice and fiber of half a small pineapple

 Juice and fiber of two green serrano chiles

 Juice of and fiber of large lemon and zest

500 grams of sprouted or cooked chickpeas  (garbanzo beans)

1 finely chopped fresh red pepper

1 finely chopped red onion

1 diced roma tomato

Salt, pepper and cumin to taste

Handful of fresh cilantro leaves and stems, finely chopped dhania

Handful of coarsely crushed unsalted cashews

2 Haas avocados

Easy-Pineapple-Carrot-Chickpea-Salad-The Culinary-LinguistJuice the carrots, pineapple, chillies, and lemon in a juicer (with any centrifugal, one-gear, etc).  Empty the juice into a large mixing bowl, and scrape the pulp from inside the juicer into the same bowl.  Add the diced tomato, red pepper, chickpeas, onion, salt, cumin, pepper and lemon zest into the bowl with juice and pulp.  Mix well and let it sit and marinate for 20 minutes.  Mix dhania into the salad, leaving some leaves for garnish.

Cut the avocados into half and remove the flesh from the avocado shell.  Slice the avocado into long slices.  Scoop the salad into the halves of the avocado shell as an appetizer serving bowl.  Place avocado slices and dhania leaves on top as garnish.  Enjoy!  The salad can definitely be stored in the fridge and be enjoyed the following day.

Tip:  It’s best to stir in the dhania and avocado when you plan to serve and eat it immediately.

Scream for Ice Cream at Breakfast: Banana. Strawberry & Pecan Recipe-Egg and Dairy-free

In Recipe on September 13, 2012 at 19:17

Raw-Vegan Dairy-Free Ice Cream on The Culinary Linguists blog #recipeWho said you can’t eat ice cream for breakfast?  I don’t have a Vitamix. I don’t have an Oscar.  But I can still make easy raw food creations with what I have.  I’m using the trusty MegaMix Juicer.  During the days tofu was all the hype, Mom would add frozen bananas to our morning tofu smoothies. I steer clear of soy products as much as I can now, but I ALWAYS wait until bananas go brown and sweet and keep them frozen in the freezer for when the time is right.

For this recipe, I “juiced” two frozen bananas and added 6 fresh strawberries with a handful of pecans in between.  I know it may not be the best for the blade, but the soft pecans gave a creamy consistency, making it more of an ‘ice cream’ than a sorbet. The constitution of strawberries and frozen bananas creates a thick slushy texture once it passes through the juicer blade.  Slush instead of juice may pass through the juice spout, but all the frozen ‘cream’ is left inside the juicer’s filter where normally all the fiber of juicing fruits are left.

The fun part: scooping out all the ‘ice cream’ from the walls of the filter. I easily could have eaten from the juicer’s filter, but then I wouldn’t have been able to take the tantalizing photo of this simple nutritious ice cream.

Whether you are interested in raw food creations, vegan-ital cuisine, lactose intolerant recipes or just love ice cream for breakfast-this easy recipe in any juicer will make anyone a morning person screaming for ice cream!

Pink Pancake Recipe with Strawberry and Beetroot

In Recipe on November 17, 2011 at 12:21

Healthy Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #beetroot

Mickey Mouse pancakes were cool growing up.  I  got to eat dessert for breakfast; sugar-gooey syrupy pancakes with chocolate chip eyes, a cherry nose and whip cream smiles.  These days, I discovered eating pink pancakes are just as fun for breakfast and have a natural sweetness thanks to the sugarbeet and strawberries added in the batter.  By transforming your juiced fiber from your juicer into a delicious batter you can get a nutritious colorful pancake fry-up for breakfast that tastes like dessert but provides you with a wholesome breakfast.  It looks like you are cooking playdough, but I promise it’s tastes much than your days at preschool.

Here is this fun-blushing recipe:

Juice in your juicer:

1 beetroot

6 strawberries

Remove the fiber of the beetroot and strawberries from inside your juicer and place in a separate bowl.Strawberry and Beet Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #breakfast

Mix dry ingredients first:

1/2 cup flour

2 TB sugar

1 tsp baking powder

1/4 cup oat milk powder

Then add:

1 egg

Beetroot & Strawberry fiber

Slowly pour 1/3 cup water (or the beetroot/strawberry juice) into the bowl until batter is at a  thick but smooth consistency.

Heat a dab of butter/oil on your griddle and spoon the batter on the surface, spreading it out in the shape you desire. Spread it out to about a centimeter deep and let it cook on one side on high heat for 3 minutes. If it’s easy to slide on the pan, then flip it. This batter is super easy to flip but can burn fast so keep an eye on it.

Frying Note:  Since there is beetroot and strawberries mixed into the batter, the inside layer between the cooked sides will remain soft.  Don’t mistaken it as it being undercooked . . . It won’t become cooked dough because the heated beetroot and strawberry give it the soft gooey consistency on the inside.  When it gets to a golden colour on both sides, consider it cooked.

Here’s the fun part.  When you take it off the heat, spread tahini on top or mascarpone cheese.  Serve with fresh strawberries and your favorite syrup.  I drizzled the famous Prickly Pear for added sweetness. Garnish as you like using fresh fruit.

Strawberry and Beet Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #breakfast #africa

Sweet Note: The sweetness of the strawberries and beetroot are already in the batter, so add more of less sugar into the batter to your taste.  I like things sweet so adding just 2 TB is enough since I load up the pancakes with syrup afterwards.  Plus if you substitute water for beet-strawberry juice, than the sweet content will be even higher, leaving no need for sugar.

TIP:  These pancakes can easily become savoury, just leave out the sugar.  Enjoy pink pancakes for lunch and add stir-fried vegetables or a lentil curry inside. Yum!

Keep it Fresh with Juice and Beets

In Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on November 10, 2011 at 13:15

When my amigaFresh Carrot and Beetroot Juice on The Culinary Linguist Blog #juice, talented singer/songwriter, Ernestine Deane, was preparing to migrate to Germany, she generously gave her juicer a new home, which is now my new favourite kitchen instrument.  Up until Ernestine’s last week in Cape Town, the Le Dou MagiMix spun out delicious alchemy for her family, most importantly fresh orange juice to keep the immune system boosting during the last winter months in the Cape Town peninsula.  Now that oranges are less in abundance and spring has come into play, the iron and folic acid powerhouse: beetroot is added to every juice mix I make. Find out more what beets have to offer at: Juicing for your Health.Fresh Carrot and Beetroot Juice on The Culinary Linguist Blog #juice

The recipe below is my morning favourite.  Rich in beta-carotene, anti-oxidants and iron . . . It makes me feel that I’ll never have to wear blush again if I keep consuming such colourful produce. Turn up the volume to soulful dub while you juice your carrot sticks and beets.  It will brighten your insides and out: Play it here and wash your veggies nice.

In your juicer:

Six whole carrots

1 beetroot

Six strawberries

Healthy Juice on The Culinary Linguist Blog #juice #recipe

Chop some fresh mint for a natural mouth freshener while you gulp down the goodness.

Makes almost a pint of juice!  Chug it down.

Dankie Erniewam! x

TIP: Juice the carrots first and remove the carrot fiber from the juicing blades and place in your garden compost.  The worms will thank you. Then juice the beetroot and strawberries and save the fiber so you can later transform it into a scrumptious breakfast. (I made pink pancakes with it.)  Stay tight for that yummy post soon.

Fresh Carrot and Beetroot Juice on The Culinary Linguist Blog #juice #recipe

It’s not Rabbit Food, It’s Rainbow Raw Salsa Salad.

In Recipe on November 9, 2011 at 12:34

Call it rabbit food, but it is damn delicious and surprisingly filling too.  Inspired by Raw-vember, I made a spicy salad that is bright and tangy in flavour and festive on the eye.

Raw Salsa Salad on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

This is a super quick, easy and yummy crunch salad that has major nutrients because it is a whole bunch of raw vegetables and fruit at its best.  It can easily be a dish in a non-raw setting and served with tortilla chips and used as a salsa or sambal to any main dish.

I recently bought an organic cold-pressed Omega 3-6-9 (Hemp, Sesame, Pumpkinseed, Flax) oil blend and added that to the raw ingredients thanks to Crede Oils.  It gave a delicious but different flavour instead of using extra virgin olive oil.

Try this recipe out with whatever produce is freshest in your fridge but this combination is a great balance of colour and flavour.

Rainbow Salsa Salad: a Raw food discovery

2 Roma tomatoes

1 large carrot

1/4 red onion

1/2 lemon with peel

1 yellow pepper

1 Serrano chile

1 kiwi

2 tablespoons of Crede’s Omega 3-6-9 Oil

Salt and Pepper to taste

2 TB sunflower seeds

Wash your vegetables and fruit thoroughly and quarter the tomatoes, carrot, onion, yellow pepper, lemon and chile. (Leave the chile out if you don’t want the kick)  Put all in a food processor and pulse for 6 seconds so they have been chopped in small chewable pieces.  Place chopped vegetables and fruit into a bowl and drizzle Omega 3-6-9 oil.  Put salt and pepper and sunflower seeds on top and stir until the salad is coated in the oil, salt and pepper and the sunflowers are distributed around.  Garnish with slices of kiwi.  Eat immediately. Enjoy the chew!

Raw Spicy Salsa Salad on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

To Cook or Dehydrate: Raw Food Recipes and Creativity

In Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on November 8, 2011 at 11:54

Rawlicious on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

I just learned how to harvest Aloe Ferox from the ‘cook’ book Rawlicious-Recipes for Radiant Health.  It’s a recipe book that encourages you to make colourful and vibrant food by encouraging you to put aloe in your smoothies, have sprouts as a kitchen staple,  and make edible flower salads that look like birthday confetti.  Who wouldn’t want to pick flowers and eat them too? 

I’ve enjoyed some great raw food dishes from this book made by friends who have created delicious versions of the Mango-gooseberry cheesecake and savoury snacks. The Rawlicious team, Lexi, Beryn and Peter, have put together a beautiful book that makes it fun and intriguing to incorporate raw dishes into your daily graze.  I don’t think I’ll ever substitute pancakes on the griddle for dehydrated ones but I most definitely will enjoy the creativity that goes into making other raw food dishes.  It’s a proudly South African Raw Recipe book that even attempts biltong in the form of aubergine. Props to that! I most definitely am going to try it out and attempt the beetroot ravioli too. I love having a recipe book that experiments with all the possibilities that food in it’s natural element has to offer.  Stay tuned for some posts on making these raw recipes come alive in true culinary linguistic style.

Raw Food on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

Do you have any great raw recipes to share?  I’d love to hear your tips, post your links, methods, and pics right here. The food pictures posted are from home gardens in my paternal grandmother’s village, Alepohori, Greece in the Peloponnese.  A place where radiant health is determined by the food you grow and the food you eat.

Raw Food on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

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