Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘Gluten-free diet’

Easy Spicy Zesty Sweet Chickpea Salad Recipe

In Recipe on June 27, 2013 at 14:34

Easy-Pineapple-Carrot-Chickpea-Salad-The Culinary-Linguist

What happens when you juice pineapples, carrots and fresh green serrano chiles?

A spunky zesty salad with sweet and spicy flavours can be created to fuel you through the day.   Last week, we bought lots of great farm produce from the City Bowl Market.

Back at home, I put pineapple and carrots and threw in a couple fresh green serrano chiles into the juicer to see if anything would come out.  Some great juice was made, but the pulp left inside was looking equally nutritious and delicious.

Spontaneous creations is how I would describe my kitchen technique.  I love creating recipes that make ordinary whole foods into unique delicious dishes.  Like James Beard once said, “When cook, you never stop learning.  That’s the fascination of it.”  With any chance to experiment in my kitchen with fresh ingredients, I let the space between mistakes and alchemy emerge.  Adding chiles into the juicer seemed natural and somehow, necessary.

I’ve shared some fun recipes before that have worked out great like: Strawberry-Beetroot Flapjacks, and Banana-Pecan Sorbet.  When creations in the kitchen lead to easy vibrant dishes, I get excited to share them with you.  Here’s what happened when I decided to juice green chiles with pineapples and carrots:

 The Spicy Zesty Sweet Chickpea Salad

Instead of throwing the pulp from the centrifugal juice extractor away or into your compost bin, try adding it to recipes like this one:

Juice and fiber of three medium sized carrots

 Juice and fiber of half a small pineapple

 Juice and fiber of two green serrano chiles

 Juice of and fiber of large lemon and zest

500 grams of sprouted or cooked chickpeas  (garbanzo beans)

1 finely chopped fresh red pepper

1 finely chopped red onion

1 diced roma tomato

Salt, pepper and cumin to taste

Handful of fresh cilantro leaves and stems, finely chopped dhania

Handful of coarsely crushed unsalted cashews

2 Haas avocados

Easy-Pineapple-Carrot-Chickpea-Salad-The Culinary-LinguistJuice the carrots, pineapple, chillies, and lemon in a juicer (with any centrifugal, one-gear, etc).  Empty the juice into a large mixing bowl, and scrape the pulp from inside the juicer into the same bowl.  Add the diced tomato, red pepper, chickpeas, onion, salt, cumin, pepper and lemon zest into the bowl with juice and pulp.  Mix well and let it sit and marinate for 20 minutes.  Mix dhania into the salad, leaving some leaves for garnish.

Cut the avocados into half and remove the flesh from the avocado shell.  Slice the avocado into long slices.  Scoop the salad into the halves of the avocado shell as an appetizer serving bowl.  Place avocado slices and dhania leaves on top as garnish.  Enjoy!  The salad can definitely be stored in the fridge and be enjoyed the following day.

Tip:  It’s best to stir in the dhania and avocado when you plan to serve and eat it immediately.

Cape Town’s best pizza: Ferdinando’s (and pet-friendly too)

In Events, Friend's Kitchens, Stories on April 16, 2012 at 16:04
Ferdinando's Pizza on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

The Don Ferdinando and BYOB

Build it and they will come.  That is the birth story of Ferdinando’s and their quest to sell 10,000 pizzas.

Our friends, Kimon and Diego have been opening their doors to family and friends for countless fun, vibrant foodie celebrations.  Whether it was a birthday or post-4am Long Street search for food, we always were generously fed.  With Manu Chao pumping through the stereo, you relax and share nourishing homemade food in the comfort of their clementine and paprika painted walls.  I’m now remembering the days before Ferdinando’s:  Diego’s Fish Festival with Octopus potato salad with pots of Portuguese mussels .

Last week, Kimon reminded me, “We haven’t been invited out to dinner in AGES!”  My cheeky response: “Well, can we have Ferdinando’s pizza take-away at our house?”  I’ve learned that friends who build a pizza oven in their own home still want to go to dinner parties too!

Ferdinando's Pizza chef on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

Ferdinando's Pizza oven on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

The inside oven

When you’re at Ferdinando’s, you’re eating at the best pizza joint in  Cape Town. It feels like you’re dining or entertaining at home and you forget you’re a paying patron yet there’s a nice feeling knowing you don’t have to do the dishes.

But let’s rewind to April 15th: Kimon’s birthday.

Birthday at Ferdinando’s

We celebrated the official opening of Ferdinando’s-the best Italian pizza speak-easy in town. Everybody and their mom knows it (mine does).  It’s not your average pop-up restaurant. It’s guerilla gourmet. Diego loves creating, Kimon is a creative and together they created a love child:  she’s warm and hot all day long (I’m talking about their pizza oven, guys.)

It’s in their previous dining room, but it all makes sense when you sit around the counter and enjoy the edible doppio zero crust canvas of melted cheese and fresh local and Italian ingredients.

Diego and his fire

Since Kimon’s birthday, we have brought numerous friends and my whole family to get in on this bubbling pizza sensation.  We even included our puppy, Lorenzo who loves his older cousin, Ferdinando: the boss, the dueño, the dog, the inspiration for the pizzeria’s name.  Any comments, concerns, complaints?  Talk to him.

Ferdinando's Pizza on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

No doggie bags at Ferdinando’s

Ferdinando's Pizza menu on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

The beginning of the pizza quest

Ferdinando’s Pizza on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

My Mom and Pops, self-proclaimed pizza lovers and global food critics, rate Ferdinando’s pizza  top-notch. On their world tour, they ate at Ferdinando’s at least once a week in June and July to keep their winter fingers warm and their stomachs lined with Grizzly and Shanico’s.  It was the only way to make it through the Cape Town frigid rain and wind-warm up by the wood-burning oven and digest the best immune boosters: Extra garlic four cheese pizza and don’t pass on the Tiger Sauce!

My brother-in law, Billy, specially requested a beef calzone from Diego (there’s nothing this oven can’t do.)

Ferdinando's Pizza calzone on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

The Winter Calzone

My sister, Koko, said  “Yes” to the mozzerella baby (Kimon’s term for eating copious amounts at Ferdinando’s pizza).  Koko used to pick the cheese off her pizza in the 90’s before we had any awareness of Vegan and Lactose-Intolerance diets.  One night at Ferdinando’s pizza can make any Vegan beg for a French Prince. They even make Gluten-free-dom crusts!

Koko eating her share of mozzarella and camembert

And so the love saga continues.  Kimon and Diego love Ferdinando, we love them AND their pizza-oven addition.  We’ll keep supporting them even after the 10,000th pizza is sold and sit down to joy with a reservation for 2 and 1/4, Chris, myself and pup, Lorenzo.

Athena and Chris at Ferdinando's Pizza on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

Pizza is love yo

Call Kimon or Diego for your own mozzarella baby with Tiger sauce for any Wed, Thurs, Friday Evening 6pm-10pm. And book on Saturdays for your own foodie celebration for 15 or more.  On Monday and Tuesdays, they’ll be eating at our house 😉

CONTACT:Kimon at Ferdinando's Pizza on The Culinary Linguists blog #capetown

Mr Diego il chef +27 843519248; miss Kimon the artist +27 847710485.

It’s not Rabbit Food, It’s Rainbow Raw Salsa Salad.

In Recipe on November 9, 2011 at 12:34

Call it rabbit food, but it is damn delicious and surprisingly filling too.  Inspired by Raw-vember, I made a spicy salad that is bright and tangy in flavour and festive on the eye.

Raw Salsa Salad on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

This is a super quick, easy and yummy crunch salad that has major nutrients because it is a whole bunch of raw vegetables and fruit at its best.  It can easily be a dish in a non-raw setting and served with tortilla chips and used as a salsa or sambal to any main dish.

I recently bought an organic cold-pressed Omega 3-6-9 (Hemp, Sesame, Pumpkinseed, Flax) oil blend and added that to the raw ingredients thanks to Crede Oils.  It gave a delicious but different flavour instead of using extra virgin olive oil.

Try this recipe out with whatever produce is freshest in your fridge but this combination is a great balance of colour and flavour.

Rainbow Salsa Salad: a Raw food discovery

2 Roma tomatoes

1 large carrot

1/4 red onion

1/2 lemon with peel

1 yellow pepper

1 Serrano chile

1 kiwi

2 tablespoons of Crede’s Omega 3-6-9 Oil

Salt and Pepper to taste

2 TB sunflower seeds

Wash your vegetables and fruit thoroughly and quarter the tomatoes, carrot, onion, yellow pepper, lemon and chile. (Leave the chile out if you don’t want the kick)  Put all in a food processor and pulse for 6 seconds so they have been chopped in small chewable pieces.  Place chopped vegetables and fruit into a bowl and drizzle Omega 3-6-9 oil.  Put salt and pepper and sunflower seeds on top and stir until the salad is coated in the oil, salt and pepper and the sunflowers are distributed around.  Garnish with slices of kiwi.  Eat immediately. Enjoy the chew!

Raw Spicy Salsa Salad on The Culinary Linguist Blog #rawrecipes

Prickly Cactus Pear Smoothie

In Friend's Kitchens, Recipe, Stories on March 7, 2011 at 00:25

The best thing about when friends house sit is the magic of new groceries that end up in your kitchen.  One Sunday afternoon, I discovered prickly pear syrup (turksvy stroop) in my fridge and it sat there, waiting for me to make crepes or pour it on yoghurt. Instead, it ended up in my fruit smoothie as a sweetener and added delicious flavour to an ordinary combination of vitamin C fruit. The syrup is a tradisionele resep from Cradock, South Africa.

Prickly Pear Smoothie:

1 frozen ripe plum

1 frozen orange

300 ml water

50 ml prickly pear syrup

On the bottle shares a food story about Prickly Pears in South Africa: The earliest pioneers in South Afria were bound to live from raw plant and animal products.  Sugar was almost unobtainable and they has to make their food tasty. The juice of the wild growing prickly pear was extracted and then without adding water or sugar, it was cooked over an open fire for many hours, until only a concentrate remained.  Great amounts of fruit are needed for only one bottle of syrup.  To EAT: butter slice of bread on one side. turn it over so that the buttered side faces the plate, cut into little squares and drench it with syrup.  Eat it with a knife and fork. Can also be used as a topping for ice cream.  The Voortrekkers also used it as a cough remedy, and for instant energy for sick people.

A future post will definitely include Wild Food: Prickly Pear cocktail recipes. I’m sure people who lived and travelled on Southern African land before Voortrekkers time (1835) had amazing recipes with prickly pears and using it as all sorts of remedies.  Would be cool to track down some of those stories and how food rituals were learned from these nomadic encounters.

I love when new wild food ingredients find a handful of ways into your kitchen palette.  I would love some tips on how to harvest these prickly fruits!

Bread with Gluten-free Flours

In Recipe on October 29, 2010 at 13:19

 

the goodness

 

I love bread and anything to do with starch-carbs. This recipe doesn’t exclude Celiac-disease tummies out there because there is still hope if you can get your hands on stone-ground wheat flour and mix bread recipes with other gluten-free grains. I’v experimented with gluten-free grains for awhile but, for me, nothing compares to just whole grain wheat bread. This recipe contains a mix of grain goodness baked into a loaf of crusty outside and a soft spongey bed on the inside.

The recipe:

400 ml stone-ground wheat flour

300 ml digestive bran

100 ml quinoa flour

200 ml kasha (buckwheat groats) flour

10g/1 sachet of instant yeast

1 TB ml sugar

1 TB ml salt

luke warm water (300ml)

 

Mixing the water into the dry ingredients

Mix the instant yeast and sugar with 100 ml of lukewarm water. Mix them and watch it froth up.  Mix all the dry ingredients together in a bowl and make a well in the middle.  Pour the sugar, water, yeast mix in the well and start merging the dry ingredients into the well of wet ingredients.  Gradually add more lukewarm water and mix.  Mix in the water and gradually mix the ingredients together until you have an elastic dough. Knead for 5 minutes.  Allow to rise in a warm draft-free place covering the bowl with a towel or dish cloth. Whole-wheat or mixed flour breads take longer to rise so be patient. Once the dough has doubled in size, knead it again briefly.  Sprinkle the pan with oats or poppy seeds and a light coat of oil and put the dough in medium sized bread pan.

 

Bake at 200 C for 15 minutes and then 180 for 45 minutes.

 

Tip 1: Use a coffee grinder to make grain flours.  I rarely use my coffee grinder for coffee beans but if you do then it may be worth getting a second-hand grinder for cooking/baking purposes so your ingredients don’t take on the flavor of cafe. The grinder makes a fine flour to anything and motivates creativity when experimenting with ingredients!

 

fresh bread out of the oven

 

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