Athena Lamberis

Posts Tagged ‘Bread’

How to Make Easy Feta Cheese Puffs Recipe with Greek Yoghurt

In Recipe on January 16, 2015 at 16:57

During the holidays, we get those family season’s greeting cards, pictures of new babies, a synopsis of people’s year  – but my mom, she’s different.  In my Greek-American-South African family, most events and conversations revolve around food, even season’s greetings.

Below is a tried and tested recipe, a season’s greetings -written by my mom.

An easy snack you can make with delicious Greek yoghurt and a sense of humour.  Lucky you, this is a secret family recipe revealed.  Enjoy!

” Wishing you a Gastronomic, Festive, Joyous New Year, with lots of New Experiences.  May this recipe be one of them.
GREEK CHEESE PUFFSHow to make Greek feta yogurt bread balls recipe-The Culinary Linguist
(From the hands of Thea Koula,
My only living, wonderful Auntie,
Who is still the best baker)

•DOUGH•

1 medium tub Greek yogurt

1&3/4 sticks butter – (yeah! I said good puffs, not slimming) – you may cut back on the butter, and add half butter – half extra virgin olive oil, or coconut oil.  I wouldn’t – when you SIN – you SIN!!!

One t. Salt or less depending how salty your FETA is.

One tablespoon Vinegar – DO NOT FORGET THIS STEP!!!

1/2 kilo  ( 1 lb ) of self rising flour  (more/less) depending on the weather – (you can use wheat FLOUR and 1 t. baking soda)

Mix above ingredients and let the mixture rest for one, or couple of hours. After some gentle manipulation, (we all need to rest, and fluff up).

•FILLING•
200 gr feta cheese ( 3/4 lb)

1/4 of c of good Ricotta cheese (optional) 

One egg white ( save yolk for glazing the puffs)

Pepper / if you like a peppery taste like I do.

 
Mix well – at this point add whatever other cheeses are hiding in your refrigerator shelves.  Waste not!!!

(OPTIONAL)You may add some spinach or sausage or whatever you wish.

Cayenne pepper, etc.

Take a tablespoon of dough in your hand – spread it with your other hand to an open “like” shell to receive the heaping teaspoon of filling on one side. Then close the other end over the filled end, and pinch the ends together.

Sounds delicious, right? Good eating is a religious experience!!!

Place in a well greased pan, brush some egg yolk (diluted with a sprinkle of water) and use either sesame seeds on top, black sesame, or Nigella seeds to give it a finished touch.
We all look better with some finishing touches.

Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown at 180 (350) degrees.

Enjoy the homemade goodness that you just created with your hands. (it is almost like birth, only easier, faster, and sometimes more satisfying, and does not talk back to you). OOPS, forgive me my darling offsprings.

How to make Greek feta bread balls recipe-The Culinary Linguist

FYI – if you are in need for some carbs after a hard day’s work- use above dough. Fry it in butter and olive oil. While it is hot, sprinkle some (lots) sugar and cinnamon.  Enjoy the fried fritter with a cup of coffee as you listen to the clouds open up and the angels “sing to thee”.

From the Greek Gypsy
Or, Nomad Retiree a.k.a Mom of The Culinary Linguist  ”

**  If you grew up in a Greek family, you often find yourself giggling at food trends and fads that hype what your grandma’s been feeding you for years.  It’s the way food product companies like to colonise homemade traditional foods and ‘discover’ the next best thing to tortilla chips. ViVA Greek yogurt.

What to Eat when Visiting Greece’s villages: Nourishing Food Traditions

In Stories, Travel on February 5, 2012 at 13:24

Greek village food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece   Summertime and road tripping lead to some of my favorite food adventure memories.  In Greece, you can drive on national highways and come across Greek village tavernas that serve greek horiatiki salads under grapevines.  Roadside stalls are piled with local fresh, dried, and preserved food that have been made and celebrated for centuries.  Tradition, food sovereignty, and pride for fresh Greek food is celebrated in most Greek villages you visit.  It certainly reigns true in the Greek village of my Greek summer food memories, Alepohori.  My grandmother, Yiayia Chrissy was born there, and I have grown to know the similar tastes and smells she must have enjoyed in her youth. From the chestnut tree forests and oregano-lined mountains, everything was grown organically and families shared the fruits of the Arcadian soil.  Visiting Alepohori today provides me with hundreds of simple food pleasures.  Today, I am sharing a few of my many favorites that you can enjoy.

1. Drink Ouzo.   If you can find local and homemade, even better.  In the village, drinking ouzo is pastime and for some . . . an immune booster 😉 You could claim that walking down to the tavern or to your neighbour’s house for  glass of ouzo on the hill is the reason why people live to 100 here, not to mention consuming a fresh medley of mezedes everyday.   If you like to enjoy long afternoons with traditional tiny plates of food and company from your neighbours, drink ouzo.

Greek Ouzo on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

2. Pick figs and eat them.  If you are lucky enough to be in Greece during the months of July, August, September then you will be in wild food harvesting heaven.

Greek figs on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

3.  Keep an eye out for summer fruit trees.  A simple mountain walk in the afternoon will lead you to picking fresh public produce from the fruit trees.  Below is a modest harvest of bite size Grecian yellow plums.

Picking plums on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek village cats on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

4.  Visit the local cheese dairy and choose the best tasting Feta made from Goat’s milk.  If there are different cheese varieties, buy a small portion of Manouri cheese and fry it up on a skillet at home.

ImageGreek food and cheese on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceImage

5. Pick fresh tomatoes from the vine and prepare a traditional Greek village salad:

 Greek salad recipe

2 large tomatoes (cut into bite size chunks)

Put in a medium-sized bowl and add salt to taste.  Toss the tomatoes so the salt draws out the juices.

Add a half a long thin cucumber (cut into half slices)

1/4 of red onion (cut into thin slices)

1/2 green pepper (cut into thin slices)

Mix the salad together.

Drizzle Extra Virgin Olive Oil over the salad and a pinch of fresh or dried oregano.

1 slice of your fresh feta cheese (portion to your desire)

Place feta on top of the salad and sprinkle more oregano and drizzle more oil.

Add 5-7  marinated olives to the salad.

Grab forks and dive in.

(Note: Once you’ve finished you salad, leave an extra piece of Greek village bread and soak up all the golden juice: salt, tomato juice, oil and oregano, leaving your bowl clean.

Greek salad on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece #recipe

6.  Visit the local farms in the village.  Most are private plots and operate on biodynamic systems that yields incredible organic produce, beautiful to photograph and even tastier to eat straight from ground.

Greek food and natural farms on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Greek food and honey on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Be sure to taste honey made in the Peloponnesus mountains

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece
Greek men on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece
Greek child on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek donkey on The Culinary Linguists blog #GreeceGreek Sunflower on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

7.  Find out where your honey comes from.  Greek honey is so fragrant that getting a chance to see where all the flowers are in bloom makes your next spoonful a visual and sensory treat and a proud locavore.

Greek bread on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

8. Buy Greek village bread.  Next to Alepohori, there is another village, Blakhokeresia, that makes delicious authentic bread.

9.  Learn from your grandmothers.  Every house you visit, or path you cross is an opportunity to learn, taste and enjoy traditional and personal Greek food favorites.  Practice your culinary linguistics and enjoy the range of hospitality that is shown through the food and culture.  Greek village woman on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

10.  Share a delicious Greek village lunch feast with family and neighbors.  Digest it all by taking a nap-preferably in a hammock, underneath the chestnut trees.

Greek food on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

Souvlaki, rice, Greek Salad, baked lemon oven potatoes, sauteed tomato and green beans and anything else that may get piled onto your plate. It will be tasty!

Greek food and village on The Culinary Linguists blog #Greece

A Durban Curry Bunny Chow Heat Feast in Cape Town

In Events, Friend's Kitchens, Recipe on January 15, 2012 at 09:34

Durban Curry Bunny Chow on The Culinary Linguist Blog #South AfricaClimate change and Durban curry?  What do they have in common?

It’s the only meal that will cool you down when a sub-tropical heatwave rolls through Cape Town.  A humid blanket covered the the whole city.  To survive the heat, we consumed the heat.  We invited our friends and a self-proclaimed Durban curry chef to bring their favorite curry ingredients, unsliced white bread and their swimming costumes.  Together, we sat by the pool regulating our body temperatures until the heat feast began.  Here’s a sneak peak of all the spicy humid harmony that was sprinkled

around the house:

Durban Curry Bunny Chow Pool Party on The Culinary Linguist Blog #South Africa

Pimm’s lemonade and soda

Olives, kuhestan’s persoan pickled lime served with cucumber slices

Banana, coconut sambal

Raita

Onion, tomato, dhania, red/yellow/green pepper/red cabbage with lemon or rice vinegar

Nice ‘n Spicy Natal Indian Masala Curry

Guy cooked for ten of us in two pots, frying the onions in oil until golden brown, together with garlic and ginger and the spices from Nice ‘n Spice.

Keeping it orginal and true to Durban bunny chow, there was chicken and potato added and cooked together to make a nice thick curry stew.

Here is a sample recipe to try at home as per Nice ‘n Spicy spice packets:

1 kg diced beef, mutton or chicken

1/4 cup oil for frying

2 chopped medium onions

4 cloves garlic crushed

1 small piece ginger root grated

10 curry leaves optional

1 tsp salt

1 TB sugar

2 large ripe tomatoes chopped

4 potatoes peeled and cubed

1/4cup chopped coriander leaves

15 grams Nice ‘n Spicy Masala curry mix

Courtesy of www.agnet.co.za/nicenspice

Curry is best if cooked the day before and allowed to develop its full flavour overnight in the refrigerator.  We didn’t wait and left no curry drop behind.  We used bread as our utensils and wiped every flavour from the dishes clean.

Check out the behind the scenes on the slideshow:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Pink Pancake Recipe with Strawberry and Beetroot

In Recipe on November 17, 2011 at 12:21

Healthy Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #beetroot

Mickey Mouse pancakes were cool growing up.  I  got to eat dessert for breakfast; sugar-gooey syrupy pancakes with chocolate chip eyes, a cherry nose and whip cream smiles.  These days, I discovered eating pink pancakes are just as fun for breakfast and have a natural sweetness thanks to the sugarbeet and strawberries added in the batter.  By transforming your juiced fiber from your juicer into a delicious batter you can get a nutritious colorful pancake fry-up for breakfast that tastes like dessert but provides you with a wholesome breakfast.  It looks like you are cooking playdough, but I promise it’s tastes much than your days at preschool.

Here is this fun-blushing recipe:

Juice in your juicer:

1 beetroot

6 strawberries

Remove the fiber of the beetroot and strawberries from inside your juicer and place in a separate bowl.Strawberry and Beet Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #breakfast

Mix dry ingredients first:

1/2 cup flour

2 TB sugar

1 tsp baking powder

1/4 cup oat milk powder

Then add:

1 egg

Beetroot & Strawberry fiber

Slowly pour 1/3 cup water (or the beetroot/strawberry juice) into the bowl until batter is at a  thick but smooth consistency.

Heat a dab of butter/oil on your griddle and spoon the batter on the surface, spreading it out in the shape you desire. Spread it out to about a centimeter deep and let it cook on one side on high heat for 3 minutes. If it’s easy to slide on the pan, then flip it. This batter is super easy to flip but can burn fast so keep an eye on it.

Frying Note:  Since there is beetroot and strawberries mixed into the batter, the inside layer between the cooked sides will remain soft.  Don’t mistaken it as it being undercooked . . . It won’t become cooked dough because the heated beetroot and strawberry give it the soft gooey consistency on the inside.  When it gets to a golden colour on both sides, consider it cooked.

Here’s the fun part.  When you take it off the heat, spread tahini on top or mascarpone cheese.  Serve with fresh strawberries and your favorite syrup.  I drizzled the famous Prickly Pear for added sweetness. Garnish as you like using fresh fruit.

Strawberry and Beet Pancakes on The Culinary Linguist Blog #breakfast #africa

Sweet Note: The sweetness of the strawberries and beetroot are already in the batter, so add more of less sugar into the batter to your taste.  I like things sweet so adding just 2 TB is enough since I load up the pancakes with syrup afterwards.  Plus if you substitute water for beet-strawberry juice, than the sweet content will be even higher, leaving no need for sugar.

TIP:  These pancakes can easily become savoury, just leave out the sugar.  Enjoy pink pancakes for lunch and add stir-fried vegetables or a lentil curry inside. Yum!

The Perfect Beach Snack: Nutella Loukoumades (Donuts) in Parga, Greece

In Stories, Travel on August 22, 2011 at 09:04

Nutella Doughnuts Loukoumades in Greece on The Culinary Linguist Blog

 You can’t get more indulgent than pouring Nutella over fried dough.  Well I wouldn’t mind adding fresh strawberries or crushed almonds into the mix.  Regardless, everyone around the world loves fried dough.  North Americans call it doughnuts, South Africans call it vetkoek, Greeks call it loukoumades.  But not everyone pours Nutella over it.  My friend Georgia took me to Parga, a small coastal town in Northwestern Greece.  We spiraled down the mountain to the beach and swam into the chilling fresh sea. After the dip we shared some beers on the deck of her favorite bar that overlooked Parga’s harbour. She decided before we hit the road we should get Nutella loukoumades for the ride home to Ioannina.  “Yes!” I exclaimed.  We giggled as the storekeeper drizzled the chocolate over the bitesize doughnuts. We skipped through the narrow streets with our road trip snack in hand.  The elderly lady with the fruit stand told us her grapes were just as sweet but we shyly replied that we spent our last euro pennies on our Nutella treat.  Who would have thought that hot oil, dough and chocolate could make grown-up girls skip and squeal. It’s official, I’ll never say no to Nutella or to Nutella with loukoumades.  Maybe next time I’ll throw some grapes in the mix.

Parga Beach on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Greece

Celebrating Vetkoek, Beats and Madiba at the the Ubuntu Festival in Cape Town

In Events on July 18, 2011 at 13:53

Ubuntu Festival-Madiba's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownTata Mandela celebrates his 93rd birthday today.  His life and dedication to the public’s well being has been a symbol for us to trust that we have the capacity to make changes in our life that leads to freedom and positive transformation.  Giving life to metaphors.  On Sunday, July 17th, the city of Cape Town hosted the Ubuntu Festival.  Activities were bustling on St. George’s Mall & Church St and on the ground level of the Mandela Rhodes Place.

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Festival-Madiba's birthday-vetkoek on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownA festival that bridges the city’s diverse spirit had independent locally produced food and farm stalls and young local DJ’s and muso’s that delivered positively hip bass-bumping beats from the Red Bull converted land cruiser turned DJ booth. I especially enjoyed GoldTooth’s vocals that dripped like honey off the amp.

Ubuntu Festival-Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownMandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Inside the Mandela Rhodes Place, festival attendants could give 67 minutes of their time (The number of years Mandela dedicated to public service) to wash, peel, and chop vegetables for soup that was being made for the city’s shelters.  The Charity Cook and Chop had tables of donated vegetables from Shoprite surrounded by tables of chopping boards, knives and peelers that were populated by shifts of about 50 people at a time.  Everyone was in a meditative state, getting into the rhythm of chopping onions, or peeling carrots.  Some people confessed it was a therapeutic activity to prepare the food together, peel, cut and chop and watch the crates fill with all the chopped vegetables.

Ubuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownUbuntu Charity Cook Off Mandela's birthday on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownCraig Anderson, the Chief Chef at Mandela Rhodes Place led the kitchen logistics of transforming the ingredients into soup. A call for volunteers to stir and cook was announced over the upbeat radio pop songs that were provided by 94.5 Kfm when the Chef needed to quickly prepare the dinner shift for the restaurant upstairs. “Just take a look around you!” exclaimed Craig Anderson, “It’s great! All this soup will be picked up by Red Cross at 5pm to be delivered to the city’s shelters”  So much love was being put into this communal cooking event and it wasn’t the first or last time the Charity Cook was going to happen.Vegetables on Cutting board on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Earth Fair Market on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Outside along Church St and St. George’s Mall, the Earth Fair Food Market curated the stalls that served traditional Umngqusho and Vetkoek, free-range biltong, farm-cured olives and preserves, Chinese spring rolls, a variety of fragrant curries, chilli bites, freshly juiced apples and beetroot, savory pies, and sublime local wine and beers at The Laughing Crocodile Bar.

Olive Products in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownBeef Biltong in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown Fresh Produce in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #CapetownFresh Juice in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Fat cake in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Vetkoek a.k.a Fat Cake, Fried Dough, Donut of delicious Msanzi variety

The Ubuntu Festival celebrated the beautiful struggle of freedom, bringing dancing vibrations and nutritious food together in our public city centre to commemorate communities celebrating together in a democratic South Africa. With the spirit of Ubuntu in all of us-Happy Birthday Madiba!

Mandela in South Africa on The Culinary Linguist Blog #Capetown

Oat Milk Pancakes with Peach and Pear Syrup

In Recipe on March 22, 2011 at 09:09

This isn’t a vegan recipe but it can be.  It’s an alternative pancake recipe when you look into your fridge and realize the milk is all gone.  You’re still in your pajamas, too hungry to wait in a check-out line at the grocery store, so your creativity kicks in and you make a plan.

How to make Oat Milk

With a coffee grinder, grind ½ cup of oats until it becomes flour/powder. To make oat flour by the cup, add 2-3 tablespoons of the flour in a bottle and 1 cup room temperature water.  Shake the bottle so the flour disperses evenly.  Refrigerate and shake before using.

Oat-milk Tahini Pancakes with Peach-Pear syrup

1 cup stone ground brown bread wheat flour

1 cup oat milk

1 T tahini (high source in calcium)

1 T oil

1 egg

1 t baking soda

1 T sugar

½ t salt

Makes 3-4 pancakes.

Peach-Pear Syrup

1 ripe peach

1 ripe pear

2 T butter

⅓ sugar

Add your oil, egg, tahini and oat milk together and whisk.  Mix the sugar, salt, baking soda and flour together.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix together to make a batter.

Heat your griddle on high coated with a light layer of butter.  Pour one ladle of the pancake batter into the middle of the hot griddle and let it spread evenly.  Turn the pancake over when you start seeing bubbles form.  Flip the pancake and let it cook on the other side for 15 seconds.  Remove the pancake and place on a plate and place in a warming drawer.  Repeat until all the batter is used up.

Heat a small sauce pan on high and melt the butter.  Dice the peach and the pear keeping the juices from cutting the fruit.  Add the diced fruit and juice to the sauce pan and stir the melted butter evenly around the fruit.  Add sugar and let it simmer for 4-8 minutes until a syrupy consistency forms.  Remove from heat and pour over pancakes.  Eat and enjoy immediately.  Garnish with fresh cream and mint.

Fool-proof Crepes

In Recipe, Stories on January 10, 2011 at 10:56

For my birthday this year,  my ‘sweet as sugarcane’ man made us a crepe

Birthday sweets

breakfast.  His speciality in the kitchen ranges from delicious pasta dishes, creative braai ‘BBQ’ fish marinades, and his exceptional skill to flipping crepes with ‘kitchen ninja zen’ style.  There is no need for a spatula when he is around so I got a grand show of crepe-making perfection on my summer scorpion birthday.

 

 

Kitchen ninja skills: flippin' the crepe

 

When my mom visits us in Cape Town she spoils us with her own food creations and gifts-us essential kitchen necessities to recreate them, hence, why we have the most amazing T-fal Dura-base Tehnology crepe pan.  I have her crepe recipe taped to the back of my cupboard door so we can be reminded how easy it is to recreate them just as if mom was around asking if we want Nutella crepes (my love affair and ‘break-up’ with Nutella will be explained in future posts).

 

 

Home gardening

 

Strawberry season begins in November in South Africa and this year our home food gardening was successful enough to grow our own tasty sweet strawberries.  For this birthday crepe breakfast, there was just three hanging from the bush but nonetheless they proudly were eaten with our crepes.  The easy quick crepe recipe goes like this:

 

Fool-proof crepes:

 

2 eggs

¾ cup milk

1 cup flour

½ cup water

3 T melted butter

 

For sweet crepes add:   1 T sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla

For savoury crepes add: ½ teaspoon salt

fresh herbs and spice

 

Melt the butter in a pan on low heat and let it cool.  Beat the eggs in a bowl. Add the milk, water and cooled butter to the bowl.  Mix well and slowly stir in the flour.  The batter should be a consistency that is easy to pour.  Heat the crepe pan on medium heat and coat with a thin layer of butter.  Using a ladle, slowly pour a thin layer of batter on to the warm pan until it covers the surface of the pan easily.  Watch the batter cook on medium heat and when small bubbles start to form throughout the batter.  Flip or use a spatula to turn the crepe tocook evenly on the other side.  Your crepes should be golden brown for them to be cooked and soft enough to fold around your desired ingredients.  These crepes had a handful of strawberries, a sprinkle of cinnamon, a squeeze of lemon and a healthy dose of fresh cream.  A great start to any birthday!  Thank you sweetness.

 

 

 

 

Guacamole on Toast

In Recipe on December 19, 2010 at 14:11

Easy guacamole snack in 2 minutes!

Fresh vital goodness on toast, for breakfast, for a snack, appetizer, or just because it’s avocado season-Guacamole toast has been born.  Or is it the lazy way of getting all the pungent delicious flavours into one bite without cleaning a food processor or pestle and mortar?  Well if you have a cutting board and a knife, then you are ready to create this fresh rainbow plate.

The How-to:

1 medium avocado

half a yellow pepper

half a ripe tomato

a pinch of fresh cilantro

a quarter of a red onion

pinch of salt and pepper

sprinkle of chipolte pepper

sprinkle of cumin

a squeeze of fresh lemon

Toast your favorite type of bread loaf. Click here for the Bread recipe.

Cut the avocado in half and remove the pit. Spoon out on half and spread it on your toast as if it were peanut butter.  Sprinkle the cumin, salt, pepper, and chipolte pepper.  Cut the tomato, yellow pepper and onion into thin slices.  Place the slices onto your seasoned avocado toast as an open faced-sandwich style.  Top the toast with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Tip 1: Season your avocado with any spice that is sitting lonely in your spice rack or cupboard.  This is your chance to discover how deliciously seasoned your avocado on toast can be and how many flavours it can speak with spices you already have. Slice any fresh vegetable you have in your fridge: a layer of red cabbage on your open-faced toast sandwich (sarmie)?  Maybe cucumbers and carrots will go well with your yellow curry powder sprinkle.  You’ve got the bread and avocado is your butter, so pair it with some fresh produce and spices and you got a balanced plate of produce deliciousness.

Ready for a bite . . .

Bread with Gluten-free Flours

In Recipe on October 29, 2010 at 13:19

 

the goodness

 

I love bread and anything to do with starch-carbs. This recipe doesn’t exclude Celiac-disease tummies out there because there is still hope if you can get your hands on stone-ground wheat flour and mix bread recipes with other gluten-free grains. I’v experimented with gluten-free grains for awhile but, for me, nothing compares to just whole grain wheat bread. This recipe contains a mix of grain goodness baked into a loaf of crusty outside and a soft spongey bed on the inside.

The recipe:

400 ml stone-ground wheat flour

300 ml digestive bran

100 ml quinoa flour

200 ml kasha (buckwheat groats) flour

10g/1 sachet of instant yeast

1 TB ml sugar

1 TB ml salt

luke warm water (300ml)

 

Mixing the water into the dry ingredients

Mix the instant yeast and sugar with 100 ml of lukewarm water. Mix them and watch it froth up.  Mix all the dry ingredients together in a bowl and make a well in the middle.  Pour the sugar, water, yeast mix in the well and start merging the dry ingredients into the well of wet ingredients.  Gradually add more lukewarm water and mix.  Mix in the water and gradually mix the ingredients together until you have an elastic dough. Knead for 5 minutes.  Allow to rise in a warm draft-free place covering the bowl with a towel or dish cloth. Whole-wheat or mixed flour breads take longer to rise so be patient. Once the dough has doubled in size, knead it again briefly.  Sprinkle the pan with oats or poppy seeds and a light coat of oil and put the dough in medium sized bread pan.

 

Bake at 200 C for 15 minutes and then 180 for 45 minutes.

 

Tip 1: Use a coffee grinder to make grain flours.  I rarely use my coffee grinder for coffee beans but if you do then it may be worth getting a second-hand grinder for cooking/baking purposes so your ingredients don’t take on the flavor of cafe. The grinder makes a fine flour to anything and motivates creativity when experimenting with ingredients!

 

fresh bread out of the oven

 

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